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Simvastatin (By mouth)

Treats high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. May reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and related health conditions. This medicine is a statin.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Simvastatin is used together with a proper diet to treat high cholesterol and triglyceride (fat) levels in the blood. This medicine may help prevent medical problems (eg, heart attacks, strokes) caused by clogged blood vessels. Simvastatin may also be used to prevent certain types of heart problems in patients with risk factors for heart problems. Simvastatin belongs to the group of medicines… Read more
Brand names include
FloLipid, Zocor
Drug classes About this
Antihyperlipidemic
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

The role of topical simvastatin on bone regeneration: a systematic review

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the results concerning the use of simvastatin for promoting bone regeneration and to discuss the level of scientific evidence supporting such findings.

Cholesterol‐reducing drugs for brain haemorrhage (subarachnoid haemorrhage)

Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition where bleeding occurs over the surface of the brain. This bleeding usually comes from an abnormality (aneurysm) in one of the blood vessels on the brain surface. In addition to the damage caused by the initial bleeding, people with SAH often suffer a later reduction in blood flow to the brain and hence additional delayed brain injury. It has been proposed that cholesterol‐reducing drugs may reduce this delayed brain injury. This review found only one small trial of 39 participants. Cholesterol‐reducing drugs did not reduce the risk of delayed brain injury and did not significantly improve participants' degree of recovery. There were no significant differences in adverse events. This review is based on one small trial and no reliable conclusions can be drawn at present.

The use of Statins, cholesterol lowering agents, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)

MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system and it is thought to be related to abnormal working of the immune system. Preliminary studies have shown that statins, cholesterol lowering agents, have potential immunological regulation effects which may be beneficial for MS. Furthermore, statins are usually orally administered, are less expensive than other MS treatment, and are easily available.

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Summaries for consumers

Cholesterol‐reducing drugs for brain haemorrhage (subarachnoid haemorrhage)

Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition where bleeding occurs over the surface of the brain. This bleeding usually comes from an abnormality (aneurysm) in one of the blood vessels on the brain surface. In addition to the damage caused by the initial bleeding, people with SAH often suffer a later reduction in blood flow to the brain and hence additional delayed brain injury. It has been proposed that cholesterol‐reducing drugs may reduce this delayed brain injury. This review found only one small trial of 39 participants. Cholesterol‐reducing drugs did not reduce the risk of delayed brain injury and did not significantly improve participants' degree of recovery. There were no significant differences in adverse events. This review is based on one small trial and no reliable conclusions can be drawn at present.

The use of Statins, cholesterol lowering agents, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)

MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system and it is thought to be related to abnormal working of the immune system. Preliminary studies have shown that statins, cholesterol lowering agents, have potential immunological regulation effects which may be beneficial for MS. Furthermore, statins are usually orally administered, are less expensive than other MS treatment, and are easily available.

Statins for the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may suffer from irregular periods, excessive hair growth (hirsutism) and acne (pimples). High levels of serum androgens (male hormone) are one of the main features of PCOS. There is no good evidence from this review that statins improve menstrual regularity, spontaneous ovulation rate, hirsutism or acne, either alone or in combination with the combined oral contraceptive pill. There is also no good evidence that statins have a beneficial effect on hirsutism or acne (pimples) associated with PCOS. In women with PCOS, statins are effective in reducing serum androgen levels and decreasing bad cholesterol (LDL), but statins are not effective in reducing fasting insulin or insulin resistance. There is no good evidence available on the long‐term use of statins (alone or in combination) for the management of PCOS.

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