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Silodosin (By mouth)

Treats problems caused by an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH). This medicine is an alpha-blocker.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Silodosin is used to treat men who have symptoms of an enlarged prostate gland, which is also known as benign enlargement of the prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH). Benign enlargement of the prostate is a problem that can occur in men as they get older. The prostate gland is located below the bladder. As the prostate gland gets larger, certain muscles in the gland may become tight… Read more
Brand names include
Rapaflo
Drug classes About this
Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Silodosin for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Prostate enlargement is common in men as they get older and may cause difficulties in urination such as a weak stream, having to get up at night and a feeling of not emptying the bladder completely. Silodosin is a newer medication that may help with these symptoms and may cause fewer unwanted drug effects. We did this review to compare silodosin to placebo (dummy drug) and other medications.

Newer Medications for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Attributed to Benign Prostaic Hyperplasia: A Review [Internet]

To assess the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and adverse effects of newer drugs to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) attributed to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

Silodosin for the treatment of clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability

α1-Adrenergic receptor antagonists are commonly used to treat male lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We performed a literature search using PubMed, Medline via Ovid, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases to identify studies on the treatment of BPH by silodosin. Silodosin is a novel α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist whose affinity for the α1A-adrenergic receptor is greater than that for the α1B-adrenergic receptor. Therefore, silodosin does not increase the incidence of blood pressure-related side effects, which may result from the inhibition of the α1B-adrenergic receptor. Patients receiving silodosin at a daily dose of 8 mg showed a significant improvement in the International Prostate Symptom Score and maximum urinary flow rate compared with those receiving a placebo. Silodosin also improved both storage and voiding symptoms, indicating that silodosin is effective, even during early phases of BPH treatment. Follow-up extension studies performed in the United States, Europe, and Asia demonstrated its long-term safety and efficacy. In the European study, silodosin significantly reduced nocturia compared to the placebo. Although retrograde or abnormal ejaculation was the most commonly reported symptom in these studies, only a few patients discontinued treatment. The incidence of adverse cardiovascular events was also very low. Evidence showing solid efficacy and cardiovascular safety profiles of silodosin will provide a good solution for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH in an increasingly aging society.

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Summaries for consumers

Silodosin for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Prostate enlargement is common in men as they get older and may cause difficulties in urination such as a weak stream, having to get up at night and a feeling of not emptying the bladder completely. Silodosin is a newer medication that may help with these symptoms and may cause fewer unwanted drug effects. We did this review to compare silodosin to placebo (dummy drug) and other medications.

Benign enlarged prostate: Which medications can help?

Drugs that help to empty the bladder can relieve symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate. They are often used if the symptoms are such a problem that it is hard to get by in everyday life without treatment. If you have to go to the toilet several times a night and constantly feel the urge to pee during the day too because your bladder no longer fully empties itself, various medications can help. When deciding whether to take a certain medication, it is always a good idea to talk to your doctor about possible interactions with other drugs. Many older men who develop prostate problems are already taking medication for other conditions – such as high blood pressure (hypertension) or chronic illnesses.

Alpha blocker treatment for men to increase chances to have urinary catheter successfully removed

Acute urinary retention in men is a medical emergency characterised by the sudden and often painful inability to pass urine. There are many known causes including prostate obstruction (because of enlargement of the prostate or cancer), urethral strictures (a narrowing of the urethra due to scar tissue), urine infection, constipation and neurological conditions. A narrow drainage tube (urinary catheter) is temporarily inserted into the bladder through the penis to allow drainage of urine. Once the catheter is removed, some men fail to pass urine again and need to be re‐catheterised. In these men, continued use of catheters or prostate surgery are the standard treatment options. Catheters are associated with risks such as infection and can harm quality of life. Measures for increasing the rate of successful catheter removal, that is, enabling patients to urinate spontaneously again, are therefore potentially beneficial. Alpha blockers (for example tamsulosin, alfuzosin) are a group of drugs known to have positive effects on urinary symptoms such as poor urinary flow. It is believed that their relaxing effect on the prostate may also increase the chance to void again after catheter removal. This review evaluated the evidence available to support this practice.

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