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Rivaroxaban (By mouth)

Treats and prevents blood clots, which lowers the risk of stroke, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and similar conditions. This medicine is a blood thinner.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Rivaroxaban is used to treat and prevent deep venous thrombosis (DVT), a condition in which harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels of the legs. These blood clots can travel to the lungs and can become lodged in the blood vessels of the lungs, causing a condition called pulmonary embolism (PE). This medicine is used for several days after hip or knee replacement surgery while you are unable… Read more
Brand names include
Xarelto, Xarelto Starter Pack
Drug classes About this
Anticoagulant

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Anticoagulation Monitoring and Reversal Strategies for Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Apixaban: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to review the clinical effectiveness and cost of strategies to identify over-anticoagulation states and strategies to treat bleeding associated with the use of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, with the broader aim to help inform future listing recommendations and decisions, as well as clinical practice.

Dabigatran and rivaroxaban versus enoxaparin for anticoagulant therapy after total knee or hip arthroplasty

Bibliographic details: Ruan JL, Lu T, Miao JJ, Chen MY, Han ZY, Tian J.  Dabigatran and rivaroxaban versus enoxaparin for anticoagulant therapy after total knee or hip arthroplasty. Chinese Journal of Tissue Engineering Research 2013; 17(13): 2390-2398

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto): Treatment of Venous Thromboembolic Events (Deep Vein Thrombosis [DVT], Pulmonary Embolism [PE]) and Prevention of Recurrent DVT and PE [Internet]

The objective of this report is to perform a systematic review of the beneficial and harmful effects of rivaroxaban 15 mg and 20 mg for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism (PE).

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Summaries for consumers

Novel oral anticoagulants for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition in which a blood clot forms in the deep vein of the leg or pelvis. It affects approximately 1 in 1000 people. If it is not treated, the clot can travel in the blood and block the arteries in the lungs. This life‐threatening condition is called a pulmonary embolism (PE) and occurs in approximately 3 to 4 per 10,000 people. The chances of getting a DVT can be increased if people have certain risk factors. These include previous clots, prolonged periods of immobility (such as travelling on aeroplanes or bed rest), cancer, exposure to oestrogens (pregnancy, oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy), trauma and blood disorders such as thrombophilia (abnormal blood clotting). A DVT is diagnosed through determining the risk factors and performing an ultrasound of the leg veins. If a DVT is confirmed, people are treated with an anticoagulant. This medicine prevents further clots from forming. Until recently, the drugs of choice were heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists. However, these drugs can cause side effects and have limitations. Two further classes of novel oral anticoagulants have been developed: these are called direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) and factor Xa inhibitors. There are particular reasons why oral DTIs and factor Xa inhibitors might now be better medicines to use. They can be given orally, they have a predictable effect, they do not require frequent monitoring or re‐dosing and they have few known drug interactions. This review measures the effectiveness and safety of these new drugs with conventional treatment.

Novel oral anticoagulants (DOACs) for the treatment of pulmonary embolism

Venous thromboembolism is a condition where a blood clot forms in the deep veins (DVT) (most commonly of the leg) and can travel up to block the arteries in the lungs (pulmonary embolism). Pulmonary embolism is life‐threatening and occurs in approximately 3 to 4 per 10,000 people. The chances of getting a pulmonary embolism can increase with risk factors, including previous clots, prolonged periods of immobility (such as travelling on aeroplanes or bed rest), cancer, exposure to oestrogens (pregnancy, oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy), blood disorders (thrombophilia) and trauma. A pulmonary embolism is diagnosed by determining the risk factors and scanning the lungs to check for a clot. If a pulmonary embolism is confirmed, patients are treated with an anticoagulant. This prevents further clots from forming. Until recently, the drugs of choice were heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists. However, these drugs can cause side effects and have limitations. Recently two classes of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been developed: direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) and factor Xa inhibitors. There are particular reasons why oral DTIs and factor Xa inhibitors might be better medicines to use. They can be given orally, they have a predictable effect, they do not require frequent monitoring or re‐dosing and they have few known drug interactions. This review measures the effectiveness and safety of these new drugs compared with conventional treatment.

What is anti-clotting medication and how is it used safely?

Anti-clotting medication is used to prevent blood clots from forming, and therefore lower the risk of certain cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes. As the name suggests, they make sure that the blood does not clot as quickly.

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