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Rifabutin (By mouth)

Helps prevent Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease in patients with HIV.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Rifabutin is used to help prevent Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease from causing disease throughout the body in patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. MAC is an infection caused by two similar bacteria, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Mycobacterium avium is more common in patients with HIV infection. MAC also may occur in other patients… Read more
Brand names include
Mycobutin
Drug classes About this
Antitubercular

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Rifabutin for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

Among current challenges in tuberculosis treatment are reducing the length of time that drugs must be taken to less than six months and finding ways to safely combine tuberculosis drugs with those used in the treatment of HIV infection. Rifabutin is a drug that has the potential to address these issues if substituted for rifampicin, a mainstay of current treatment. This review identified five trials involving 924 people, but none were of high quality. The review found no significant differences between rifabutin‐ and rifampicin‐containing treatment in curing tuberculosis and preventing relapse, but higher doses of rifabutin might be associated with more adverse effects and there was no evidence that it could shorten treatment. However, very few people with HIV and tuberculosis, who are most likely to benefit from use of rifabutin due to its lack of interaction with antiretroviral drugs, were included in the trials. Better quality clinical trials are needed to understand the place of rifabutin in the treatment of people with tuberculosis, particularly those who also have HIV.

Interventions for the prevention of mycobacterium avium complex in adults and children with HIV

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a common complication of advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) disease and can shorten the survival of these patients. We sought to examine effectiveness of all drugs for preventing MAC infection in adults and children with HIV infection. This review included eight trials conducted in the USA and Europe, published between 1993 and 2003.

Anti‐tuberculous therapy for maintaining remission in Crohn's disease

Tuberculous bacteria have been suggested as a possible cause of Crohn's disease due to a similarity between Crohn's and tuberculous lesions when viewed under a microscope. Four studies examined the use of anti‐tuberculous therapy to reduce the chance of the disease recurring in patients with non‐active Crohn's disease. The results of these studies suggest that this treatment might be effective for this purpose. However, this finding has not been definitively proven, and anti‐tuberculous therapy should not be used to treat Crohn's disease without further study.

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Summaries for consumers

Rifabutin for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

Among current challenges in tuberculosis treatment are reducing the length of time that drugs must be taken to less than six months and finding ways to safely combine tuberculosis drugs with those used in the treatment of HIV infection. Rifabutin is a drug that has the potential to address these issues if substituted for rifampicin, a mainstay of current treatment. This review identified five trials involving 924 people, but none were of high quality. The review found no significant differences between rifabutin‐ and rifampicin‐containing treatment in curing tuberculosis and preventing relapse, but higher doses of rifabutin might be associated with more adverse effects and there was no evidence that it could shorten treatment. However, very few people with HIV and tuberculosis, who are most likely to benefit from use of rifabutin due to its lack of interaction with antiretroviral drugs, were included in the trials. Better quality clinical trials are needed to understand the place of rifabutin in the treatment of people with tuberculosis, particularly those who also have HIV.

Interventions for the prevention of mycobacterium avium complex in adults and children with HIV

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a common complication of advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) disease and can shorten the survival of these patients. We sought to examine effectiveness of all drugs for preventing MAC infection in adults and children with HIV infection. This review included eight trials conducted in the USA and Europe, published between 1993 and 2003.

Anti‐tuberculous therapy for maintaining remission in Crohn's disease

Tuberculous bacteria have been suggested as a possible cause of Crohn's disease due to a similarity between Crohn's and tuberculous lesions when viewed under a microscope. Four studies examined the use of anti‐tuberculous therapy to reduce the chance of the disease recurring in patients with non‐active Crohn's disease. The results of these studies suggest that this treatment might be effective for this purpose. However, this finding has not been definitively proven, and anti‐tuberculous therapy should not be used to treat Crohn's disease without further study.

See all (4)

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