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Riboflavin (Oral route)

Vitamins are compounds that you must have for growth and health. They are needed in small amounts only and are usually available in the foods that you eat. Riboflavin (vitamin B 2) is needed to help break down carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. It also makes it possible for oxygen to be used by your body.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Lack of riboflavin may lead to itching and burning eyes, sensitivity of eyes to light, sore tongue, itching and peeling skin on the nose and scrotum, and sores in the mouth. Your doctor may treat this condition by prescribing riboflavin for you… Read more
Brand names include
Ribo-100, Ribo-2
Drug classes About this
Nutritive Agent, Vitamin B (class)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Supplementary vitamin E, selenium, cysteine and riboflavin for preventing kwashiorkor in preschool children in developing countries

Undernutrition is one of the leading underlying causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Providing antioxidants that would help curb excess free radicals in the body may help prevent the development of kwashiorkor. We identified one cluster‐RCT that attempted to investigate this. Based on the published evidence reviewed, we could draw no firm conclusions of the benefits of supplementary antioxidants for the prevention of kwashiorkor in pre‐school children. There is a need for further research in this area to be certain if antioxidant supplementation can help prevent kwashiorkor in young children.

Corneal collagen cross‐linking for thinning of the transparent front part of the eye ('keratoconus')

Keratoconus is a condition where the transparent front of the eye (cornea) gets thinner and begins to bulge. This leads to vision problems, usually short‐sightedness (distant objects appear blurred). The condition is more common in children and young adults and can deteriorate over time. Initially glasses and contact lenses can help. If the disease progresses, the only option may be a corneal transplant.

Platelet transfusions treated to reduce transfusion‐transmitted infections for the prevention of bleeding in people with low platelet counts

The aim of this review was to assess whether specially treated pathogen‐reduced platelets, work as well as normal platelets when transfused. Specifically, do they stop or prevent bleeding as well as standard platelets; do they produce the same increase in platelet count; and does their use affect further transfusion requirements? This review also assessed whether pathogen‐reduced platelets are as safe as normal platelets, for example are they associated with any difference in the rate of death following transfusion, and are there any side effects associated with the use of these products.

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Summaries for consumers

Supplementary vitamin E, selenium, cysteine and riboflavin for preventing kwashiorkor in preschool children in developing countries

Undernutrition is one of the leading underlying causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Providing antioxidants that would help curb excess free radicals in the body may help prevent the development of kwashiorkor. We identified one cluster‐RCT that attempted to investigate this. Based on the published evidence reviewed, we could draw no firm conclusions of the benefits of supplementary antioxidants for the prevention of kwashiorkor in pre‐school children. There is a need for further research in this area to be certain if antioxidant supplementation can help prevent kwashiorkor in young children.

Corneal collagen cross‐linking for thinning of the transparent front part of the eye ('keratoconus')

Keratoconus is a condition where the transparent front of the eye (cornea) gets thinner and begins to bulge. This leads to vision problems, usually short‐sightedness (distant objects appear blurred). The condition is more common in children and young adults and can deteriorate over time. Initially glasses and contact lenses can help. If the disease progresses, the only option may be a corneal transplant.

Platelet transfusions treated to reduce transfusion‐transmitted infections for the prevention of bleeding in people with low platelet counts

The aim of this review was to assess whether specially treated pathogen‐reduced platelets, work as well as normal platelets when transfused. Specifically, do they stop or prevent bleeding as well as standard platelets; do they produce the same increase in platelet count; and does their use affect further transfusion requirements? This review also assessed whether pathogen‐reduced platelets are as safe as normal platelets, for example are they associated with any difference in the rate of death following transfusion, and are there any side effects associated with the use of these products.

See all (6)

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