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Pyrimethamine (By mouth)

Helps prevent malaria and treats toxoplasmosis, an infection caused by a parasite. Is also used to prevent other kinds of infections.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Pyrimethamine is an antiprotozoal medicine. Antiprotozoals work by killing protozoa (tiny, one-celled animals) or preventing their growth. Some protozoa are parasites that can cause many different kinds of infections in the body. This medicine is used with one or more other medicines to treat and prevent malaria and to treat toxoplasmosis. This medicine may also be used for other problems as… Read more
Brand names include
Daraprim
Drug classes About this
Antimalarial
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine plus artesunate versus sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine for treating uncomplicated malaria

Malaria is a parasitic disease spread by mosquitoes that kills thousands of people worldwide. Artemisinin‐based combination treatments are strongly advocated, but uncertainty about their availability (and cost) remains a major concern. The review includes four small randomized controlled trials, all from Africa, comparing SP plus AS with SP plus AQ for treating uncomplicated malaria. SP plus AQ performed better at destroying blood parasites at 28 days, although resistance to the drugs may have increased since the trials were performed. Adverse events were poorly reported.

Chloroquine or amodiaquine combined with sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine for treating uncomplicated malaria

Chloroquine, amodiaquine, and sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine are relatively inexpensive drugs to treat malaria. Treatment failure is a problem when these drugs are used alone because malaria parasites have become resistant to them. Based on evidence from randomized controlled trials, a combination of amodiaquine plus sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine may reduce treatment failure in some locations. It appears less likely that chloroquine plus sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine will have a treatment benefit over sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine alone.

Amodiaquine for treating malaria

Using a pilot system we have categorised this review as: Historical question ‐ no update intended. Please see "Published notes" section of the review for more details.

See all (37)

Summaries for consumers

Sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine plus artesunate versus sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine for treating uncomplicated malaria

Malaria is a parasitic disease spread by mosquitoes that kills thousands of people worldwide. Artemisinin‐based combination treatments are strongly advocated, but uncertainty about their availability (and cost) remains a major concern. The review includes four small randomized controlled trials, all from Africa, comparing SP plus AS with SP plus AQ for treating uncomplicated malaria. SP plus AQ performed better at destroying blood parasites at 28 days, although resistance to the drugs may have increased since the trials were performed. Adverse events were poorly reported.

Chloroquine or amodiaquine combined with sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine for treating uncomplicated malaria

Chloroquine, amodiaquine, and sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine are relatively inexpensive drugs to treat malaria. Treatment failure is a problem when these drugs are used alone because malaria parasites have become resistant to them. Based on evidence from randomized controlled trials, a combination of amodiaquine plus sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine may reduce treatment failure in some locations. It appears less likely that chloroquine plus sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine will have a treatment benefit over sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine alone.

Amodiaquine for treating malaria

Using a pilot system we have categorised this review as: Historical question ‐ no update intended. Please see "Published notes" section of the review for more details.

See all (19)

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