Home > Drugs A – Z > Pyrazinamide (By mouth)

Pyrazinamide (By mouth)

Treats tuberculosis (TB), usually in combination with other TB drugs.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Pyrazinamide belongs to the family of medicines called anti-infectives. It is used, along with other medicines, to treat tuberculosis (TB). To help clear up your tuberculosis (TB) infection completely, you must keep taking this medicine for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to feel better. This is very important. It is also important that you do not miss any doses. Pyrazinamide is… Read more
Drug classes About this
Antitubercular
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Six‐month therapy for people with abdominal tuberculosis

Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is a type of TB that affects the gut, the peritoneum (the lining of the abdominal cavity), abdominal lymph nodes, and, more rarely, the solid organs in the abdomen (liver, pancreas, and spleen). Abdominal TB leads to severe illness in adults and children, and can cause complications, such as bowel rupture, which can lead to death.

Rifampicin plus pyrazinamide versus isoniazid for treating latent tuberculosis infection: a meta-analysis

This well-conducted review compared the efficacy and safety of rifampicin plus pyrazinamide (RZ) with isoniazid for the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals. The authors concluded that both regimens were effective and that mortality was equivalent. However, in HIV-negative patients, RZ groups experienced more adverse events. This conclusion should be treated with caution.

WHO Treatment Guidelines for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, 2016 Update

The WHO treatment guidelines for drug-resistant tuberculosis (2016 update) contains policy recommendations on priority areas in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. The revision is in accordance with the WHO requirements for the formulation of evidence-informed policy.

See all (25)

Summaries for consumers

Six‐month therapy for people with abdominal tuberculosis

Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is a type of TB that affects the gut, the peritoneum (the lining of the abdominal cavity), abdominal lymph nodes, and, more rarely, the solid organs in the abdomen (liver, pancreas, and spleen). Abdominal TB leads to severe illness in adults and children, and can cause complications, such as bowel rupture, which can lead to death.

Alternatives to isoniazid monotherapy for preventing active tuberculosis in HIV‐negative persons

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that is caused by a bacterial infection that affects an estimated two billion people (about a third of the world's population). However, most people have dormant (latent) infections and only a small percentage of people infected with TB will develop an active disease. Preventing latent TB infection (LTBI) developing into active TB, through the use of drugs, is an important part of global TB control. Treatment with the drug isoniazid for six months is recommended, but the treatment period is long, it can cause liver damage, and only about half of the people who start this drug treatment complete it.

Substituting or adding fluoroquinolones to established first‐line antituberculous drug regimens gives no additional benefit or risks

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Over two billion people worldwide are believed to be latently infected with TB and approximately 10% of these people will develop active TB later in life. The World Health Organization currently only recommend treatment with fluoroquinolones for patients who cannot take standard first‐line drugs. In this review, we examined the effect of including fluoroquinolones in first‐line treatment regimens on people with presumed drug‐sensitive tuberculosis.

See all (6)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...