Home > Drugs A – Z > Prednisone (By mouth)

Prednisone (By mouth)

Treats many diseases and conditions, especially problems related to inflammation. This medicine is a corticosteroid.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Prednisone provides relief for inflamed areas of the body. It is used to treat a number of different conditions, such as inflammation (swelling), severe allergies, adrenal problems, arthritis, asthma, blood or bone marrow problems, endocrine problems, eye or vision problems, stomach or bowel problems, lupus, skin conditions, kidney problems, ulcerative colitis, and flare-ups of multiple sclerosisRead more
Brand names include
Contrast Allergy PreMed Pack, Deltasone, Prednicot, Rayos, Sterapred, Sterapred DS
Drug classes About this
Endocrine-Metabolic Agent, Immune Suppressant

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

A systematic review and economic model of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of docetaxel in combination with prednisone or prednisolone for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, in the UK, accounting for around 13% of male cancer deaths. In 2001, there were 26,027 new cases in England and 1746 in Wales, giving age-standardised incidence rates of 89.8 and 92.6 per 100,000 men, respectively. The majority of patients are diagnosed with early disease and have a good prognosis. However, approximately 22% of cases will be diagnosed with advanced or metastatic disease, with an additional 25% developing metastases throughout the course of the disease. The majority of prostate cancers initially respond to hormone therapy, with a median response duration in metastatic disease of around 18 months. However, in most patients the cancer will become resistant to hormonal treatment and will progress. After developing hormone-resistant disease, survival is not expected to exceed 9-12 months. Treatment for metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (mHRPC) is palliative and current advice issued by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence states that chemotherapy should be considered and trials of chemotherapy supported, and palliative radiotherapy should also be considered as a treatment option. The use of chemotherapy for mHRPC is widespread in the UK. New trials assessing the effectiveness for the treatment of mHRPC of docetaxel, which is licensed for use in combination with prednisone/prednisolone in the UK, have emerged. The cost of a course of up to 10 cycles of docetaxel at the recommended dose is approximately £11,000. Therefore the evidence must be appraised by a systematic review and economic model.

Melphalan and prednisone versus melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide for elderly and/or transplant ineligible patients with multiple myeloma: a meta-analysis

Trials comparing efficacy of melphalan prednisone (MP) with MP plus thalidomide in transplant ineligible, elderly patients with multiple myeloma have provided conflicting evidence. Although there is agreement regarding improved response rates (RRs) and higher toxicity with the addition of thalidomide to MP, the impact on progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) is less clear. We performed a meta-analysis comparing efficacy of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT) and MP by pooling results on RR, PFS and OS reported in all the identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) under a random effects model. Overall, six prospective RCTs, with data extractable from five published trials (n=1571) [corrected] were identified. The pooled odds ratio of responding to therapy with MPT vs MP was 3.39 (P<0.001, 95% CI: 2.24-5.12). The pooled hazard ratios for PFS and OS were and 0.68 (P<0.001; 95% CI: 0.55-0.82) and 0.80 (P=0.07; 95% CI: 0.63-1.02), respectively, in favor of MPT. The odds ratios for high grade peripheral neuropathy and deep venous thrombosis were 6.6 and 2.4, respectively, in favour of MP. There was significant heterogeneity among the RCTs. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that in previously untreated, transplant ineligible, elderly myeloma patients, the addition of T to MP results in significantly improved RR and PFS with a trend towards improvement in OS compared with MP alone, but at a cost of significantly greater toxicity.

Immunosuppressive treatment for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults

Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare disease whose cause is unknown and is a condition in which the glomeruli leak protein from the blood into the urine. It is described as focal because only some of the glomeruli become scarred (while others remain normal) and segmental as only part of an individual glomerulus is damaged. Over half of all persons with FSGS will develop chronic kidney failure within 10 years. Thus, immunosuppressive strategies are used to control proteinuria and prevent kidney failure. This systematic review identified four studies (108 participants) investigating immunosuppressive treatments for adults with biopsy‐proven FSGS. Adult patients treated with cyclosporin A in combination with prednisone were more likely to achieve partial remission of nephrotic syndrome compared with prednisone alone, however this result is based on only one small study. No data was available on the progression to kidney failure or death.

See all (259)

Summaries for consumers

Immunosuppressive treatment for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults

Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare disease whose cause is unknown and is a condition in which the glomeruli leak protein from the blood into the urine. It is described as focal because only some of the glomeruli become scarred (while others remain normal) and segmental as only part of an individual glomerulus is damaged. Over half of all persons with FSGS will develop chronic kidney failure within 10 years. Thus, immunosuppressive strategies are used to control proteinuria and prevent kidney failure. This systematic review identified four studies (108 participants) investigating immunosuppressive treatments for adults with biopsy‐proven FSGS. Adult patients treated with cyclosporin A in combination with prednisone were more likely to achieve partial remission of nephrotic syndrome compared with prednisone alone, however this result is based on only one small study. No data was available on the progression to kidney failure or death.

Corticosteroids for myasthenia gravis

Myasthenia gravis is caused by the body's antibodies impairing transmission of nerve impulses to muscles, resulting in fluctuating weakness and fatigue. Acute attacks can be life threatening because of swallowing or breathing difficulties. Seven randomised controlled trials which included in all 199 participants are published. None fulfilled the presently accepted standards of a high‐quality trial. All these studies have risks of bias and have a weak statistical power. Limited evidence from randomised controlled trials suggests that corticosteroids offer short‐term benefit compared with placebo (dummy treatment). This supports the conclusions of observational studies and expert opinion. Limited evidence from randomised controlled trials does not show any difference in efficacy between corticosteroids and either azathioprine or intravenous immunoglobulin. All trials had design flaws which limit the strength of the conclusions. Further randomised controlled trials are needed.

Prevention of recurrent miscarriage for women with antiphospholipid antibody or lupus anticoagulant

Treatments for recurrent miscarriage when there are antibodies in the mothers blood.

See all (73)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...