Home > Drugs A – Z > Prednicarbate (Topical application route)

Prednicarbate (Topical application route)

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Prednicarbate topical is used to help relieve redness, itching, swelling, or other discomfort caused by skin conditions. This medicine is a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid). This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Dermatop, Dermatop E
Drug classes About this
Adrenal Glucocorticoid, Corticosteroid, Intermediate

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Interventions to reduce Staphylococcus aureus in the management of atopic eczema

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis or childhood eczema) is a big problem worldwide. The skin of people with atopic eczema often contains high numbers of a bacterium called Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus).

Drug Class Review: Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors: Final Report [Internet]

Since December 2000, two topical calcineurin inhibitors have been approved for use in patients with atopic dermatitis in the United States and Canada. Since the approval of these agents, several case reports of malignancies (skin and lymphoma) have been reported to the United States Food and Drug Administration, causing a black box warning to be placed in each product's labeling. Several pharmacokinetic analyses, commentaries, and editorials have been published refuting the addition of the black box warning. In light of these findings, this comparative effectiveness review of 2 topical calcineurin inhibitors was commissioned to identify whether additional good-quality studies on safety have been published and to determine whether differences in efficacy and effectiveness exist between the 2 topical agents. The purpose of this review is to compare the effectiveness and harms of topical calcineurin inhibitors in persons with atopic dermatitis or eczema.

Atopic Eczema in Children: Management of Atopic Eczema in Children from Birth up to the Age of 12 Years

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory itchy skin condition that develops in early childhood in the majority of cases. It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation (flares, which may occur as frequently as two or three per month) and remissions, except for severe cases where it may be continuous. Certain patterns of atopic eczema are recognised. In infants, atopic eczema usually involves the face and extensor surfaces of the limbs and, while it may involve the trunk, the napkin area is usually spared. A few infants may exhibit a discoid pattern (circular patches). In older children flexural involvement predominates, as in adults. Diagnostic criteria are discussed in Chapter 3. As with other atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), atopic eczema often has a genetic component. In atopic eczema, inherited factors affect the development of the skin barrier, which can lead to exacerbation of the disease by a large number of trigger factors, including irritants and allergens. Many cases of atopic eczema clear or improve during childhood while others persist into adulthood, and some children who have atopic eczema `will go on to develop asthma and/or allergic rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The epidemiology of atopic eczema is considered in Chapter 5, and the impact of the condition on children and their families/caregivers is considered in Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

Summaries for consumers

Interventions to reduce Staphylococcus aureus in the management of atopic eczema

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis or childhood eczema) is a big problem worldwide. The skin of people with atopic eczema often contains high numbers of a bacterium called Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus).

Eczema: Steroids and other topical medications

A lot of people are wary of steroids. If used properly, though, they rarely lead to side effects. And they are only used for acute flare-ups, not for long-term treatment. Preventive intermittent treatment with topical corticosteroids can help with frequent flare-ups.In mild eczema, a special skin care routine may be enough to keep the condition at bay. If the skin is inflamed and itchy, a topical corticosteroid ointment or cream is used on the rash too. Topical means “applied to the skin.” These products can effectively reduce the itching and inflammation. They are used until the symptoms go away. If for some reason steroids shouldn’t be used, the medications pimecrolimus or tacrolimus can be considered. These belong to a group of medications called calcineurin inhibitors. They are used if, for instance, sensitive areas such as the face or genitals are affected.

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...