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Penicillin G Sodium (By injection)

Treats infections caused by bacteria. This medicine is a penicillin antibiotic.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Drug classes About this
Antibiotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Azithromycin versus penicillin G benzathine for early syphilis

Syphilis is a complex disease that can involve virtually any organ in the body. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 12 million people are infected with syphilis worldwide. Some early research suggested that azithromycin was superior to benzathine penicillin G in the treatment of early syphilis, and that azithromycin can overcome the disadvantages of penicillin G benzathine. This review of three trials failed to identify a difference between azithromycin and benzathine penicillin G for early syphilis in the odds of cure rate, with the result being too imprecise to confidently rule out the superiority of either treatment option. Although gastrointestinal adverse effects were more common in the participants on azithromycin, than in those given benzathine penicillin G, the difference with benzathine penicillin did not reach statistical significance. More research is required in this area.

Oral antibiotics appear to be as effective as parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of severe pneumonia in children

Acute respiratory infection (including pneumonia) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age in developing countries. Antibiotics are needed when a bacterial infection is suspected. When children are hospitalised they often receive injectable antibiotics. This has disadvantages: pain, risk of other infections and cost. There are studies that show that oral antibiotics are effective when children are treated as outpatients. The objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness and safety of oral antibiotics compared to parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of pneumonia in children less than five years old. Oral therapy appears to be an effective and safe alternative to parenteral antibiotics in hospitalised children with severe pneumonia who do not have any serious signs or symptoms. There is currently insufficient evidence to determine the relative benefits and harms of oral antibiotics in children with severe pneumonia if serious signs and symptoms are present or in children with severe pneumonia associated with bacterial confirmation or lobar consolidation on chest X‐ray.

Genital ulcer disease treatment for reducing sexual acquisition of HIV

The presence of a genital ulcer would provide an entry point for the HIV virus if an HIV‐negative individual with an ulcer has unprotected sexual intercourse with an HIV‐infected person. Treatment of the condition causing the genital ulcer would allow the ulcer to heal and therefore reduce the chances of HIV acquisition. This review assessed whether giving treatment for diseases that present with ulcers in the genital region would reduce sexual acquisition of HIV. Three studies were identified involving 173 HIV‐negative patients with genital ulcers. These studies did not provide sufficient evidence that treatment of genital ulcer diseases reduces sexual acquisition of HIV infection. However, genital ulcer diseases are public health problems in their own right and patients with these conditions should be treated appropriately; whether the treatment reduces the risk of HIV infection or not.

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Summaries for consumers

Azithromycin versus penicillin G benzathine for early syphilis

Syphilis is a complex disease that can involve virtually any organ in the body. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 12 million people are infected with syphilis worldwide. Some early research suggested that azithromycin was superior to benzathine penicillin G in the treatment of early syphilis, and that azithromycin can overcome the disadvantages of penicillin G benzathine. This review of three trials failed to identify a difference between azithromycin and benzathine penicillin G for early syphilis in the odds of cure rate, with the result being too imprecise to confidently rule out the superiority of either treatment option. Although gastrointestinal adverse effects were more common in the participants on azithromycin, than in those given benzathine penicillin G, the difference with benzathine penicillin did not reach statistical significance. More research is required in this area.

Oral antibiotics appear to be as effective as parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of severe pneumonia in children

Acute respiratory infection (including pneumonia) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age in developing countries. Antibiotics are needed when a bacterial infection is suspected. When children are hospitalised they often receive injectable antibiotics. This has disadvantages: pain, risk of other infections and cost. There are studies that show that oral antibiotics are effective when children are treated as outpatients. The objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness and safety of oral antibiotics compared to parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of pneumonia in children less than five years old. Oral therapy appears to be an effective and safe alternative to parenteral antibiotics in hospitalised children with severe pneumonia who do not have any serious signs or symptoms. There is currently insufficient evidence to determine the relative benefits and harms of oral antibiotics in children with severe pneumonia if serious signs and symptoms are present or in children with severe pneumonia associated with bacterial confirmation or lobar consolidation on chest X‐ray.

Genital ulcer disease treatment for reducing sexual acquisition of HIV

The presence of a genital ulcer would provide an entry point for the HIV virus if an HIV‐negative individual with an ulcer has unprotected sexual intercourse with an HIV‐infected person. Treatment of the condition causing the genital ulcer would allow the ulcer to heal and therefore reduce the chances of HIV acquisition. This review assessed whether giving treatment for diseases that present with ulcers in the genital region would reduce sexual acquisition of HIV. Three studies were identified involving 173 HIV‐negative patients with genital ulcers. These studies did not provide sufficient evidence that treatment of genital ulcer diseases reduces sexual acquisition of HIV infection. However, genital ulcer diseases are public health problems in their own right and patients with these conditions should be treated appropriately; whether the treatment reduces the risk of HIV infection or not.

See all (6)

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