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Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate (By mouth)

Treats heartburn, stomach ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and a damaged esophagus. Also helps prevent stomach bleeding in critically ill patients. This medicine contains a proton pump inhibitor (PPI).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate combination is used to treat certain conditions where there is too much acid in the stomach. It is used to treat gastric and duodenal ulcers, erosive esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is a condition where the acid in the stomach washes back up into the esophagus. Sometimes this medicine is used in combination with antibiotics (eg, Read more
Brand names include
Omeprazole-Sodium Bicarbonate, Zegerid, Zegerid OTC
Drug classes About this
Antidote, Gastric Acid Secretion Inhibitor

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Drug Class Review: Proton Pump Inhibitors: Final Report Update 5 [Internet]

Proton pump inhibitors decrease secretion of gastric acid. They act by blocking the last enzyme in the system that actively transports acid from gastric parietal cells into the gastrointestinal lumen, hydrogen–potassium adenosine triphosphatase, also known as the proton pump. Omeprazole, the first drug in this class, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 4 other proton pump inhibitors have been introduced: lansoprazole (1995), rabeprazole (1999), pantoprazole (2000), and esomeprazole (2001). In 2003 omeprazole became available over-the-counter in the United States. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of different PPIs.

Alcohol Use Disorders: Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Physical Complications [Internet]

Alcohol is the most widely used psychotropic drug in the industrialised world; it has been used for thousands of years as a social lubricant and anxiolytic. In the UK, it is estimated that 24% of adult men and 13% of adult women drink in a hazardous or harmful way. Levels of hazardous and harmful drinking are lowest in the central and eastern regions of England (21–24% of men and 10–14% of women). They are highest in the north (26–28% of men, 16–18% of women). Hazardous and harmful drinking are commonly encountered amongst hospital attendees; 12% of emergency department attendances are directly related to alcohol whilst 20% of patients admitted to hospital for illnesses unrelated to alcohol are drinking at potentially hazardous levels. Continued hazardous and harmful drinking can result in dependence and tolerance with the consequence that an abrupt reduction in intake might result in development of a withdrawal syndrome. In addition, persistent drinking at hazardous and harmful levels can also result in damage to almost every organ or system of the body. Alcohol-attributable conditions include liver damage, pancreatitis and the Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Key areas in the investigation and management of these conditions are covered in this guideline.

Diarrhoea and Vomiting Caused by Gastroenteritis: Diagnosis, Assessment and Management in Children Younger than 5 Years

When young children suddenly experience the onset of diarrhoea, with or without vomiting, infective gastroenteritis is by far the most common explanation. A range of enteric viruses, bacteria and protozoal pathogens may be responsible. Viral infections account for most cases in the developed world. Gastroenteritis is very common, with many infants and young children experiencing more than one episode in a year.

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Summaries for consumers

Comparing Proton Pump Inhibitors

How do proton pump inhibitors compare in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)?

Drugs for reducing stomach acid for people with cystic fibrosis

We reviewed the evidence for using drugs to reduce stomach acid in people with cystic fibrosis.

PubMed Health Blog...

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