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Nitroglycerin, Rapid Release (By mouth)

Treats or prevents angina (chest pain). This medicine is a nitrate.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
NitroMist, Nitroglycerin Lingual Aerosol, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat
Other forms
Absorbed through the skin, Absorbed through the skin, By injection, By mouth, Into the rectum, Oral route, Sublingual route, Transdermal route
Drug classes About this
Antianginal, Coronary Vasodilator
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Stroke: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Initial Management of Acute Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

This guideline covers interventions in the acute stage of a stroke (‘acute stroke’) or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Most of the evidence considered relates to interventions in the first 48 hours after onset of symptoms, although some interventions of up to 2 weeks are covered as well. This guideline is a stand-alone document, but is designed to be read alongside the Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party guideline ‘National clinical guideline for stroke’ which considers evidence for interventions from the acute stage into rehabilitation and life after stroke. The Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party guideline is an update of the 2004 2nd edition and includes all the recommendations contained within this guideline. This acute stroke and TIA guideline is also designed to be read alongside the Department of Health’s (DH) ‘National stroke strategy’ (NSS). Where there are differences between the recommendations made within this acute stroke and TIA guideline and the NSS, the Guideline Development Group (GDG) members feel that their recommendations are derived from systematic methodology to identify all of the relevant literature.

Stable Angina: Methods, Evidence & Guidance [Internet]

Angina is pain or constricting discomfort that typically occurs in the front of the chest (but may radiate to the neck, shoulders, jaw or arms) and is brought on by physical exertion or emotional stress. It is the main symptomatic manifestation of myocardial ischaemia and is usually caused by obstructive coronary artery disease restricting oxygen delivery to the cardiac myocytes. Other factors may exacerbate angina either by further restricting oxygen delivery (for example severe anaemia) or by increasing oxygen demand (for example left ventricular hypertrophy). Angina symptoms are associated with other cardiac disease such as aortic stenosis but the management of angina associated with non-coronary artery disease is outside the scope of this guideline.

Hypertension in Pregnancy: The Management of Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

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