Home > Drugs A – Z > Neostigmine (By mouth)

Neostigmine (By mouth)

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Neostigmine is used to treat a muscle disease called myasthenia gravis. . This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription … Read more
Brand names include
Prostigmin Bromide
Other forms
By injection
Drug classes About this
Central Nervous System Agent, Immunological Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Neostigmine for reversing muscle paralysis in children following surgery

We reviewed the evidence about whether neostigmine should be routinely used to prevent residual muscle paralysis in children who received muscle relaxants during surgery.

[Epidural neostigmine for labor pain: a meta-analysis]

Bibliographic details: Chen CW, Chen QB, Ouyang Q, Liu FT, Yuan HB.  [Epidural neostigmine for labor pain: a meta-analysis]. Academic Journal of Second Military Medical University 2012; 33(3): 298-304

Effectiveness of caudal bupivacaine with neostigmine for postoperative pain management after hypospadias surgery in children: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Lan Y P, Huang Z H, Zuo Y X.  Effectiveness of caudal bupivacaine with neostigmine for postoperative pain management after hypospadias surgery in children: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2009; 9(6): 670-673

See all (23)

Summaries for consumers

Neostigmine for reversing muscle paralysis in children following surgery

We reviewed the evidence about whether neostigmine should be routinely used to prevent residual muscle paralysis in children who received muscle relaxants during surgery.

Sugammadex, a new medication for selective reversal of muscle weakness after surgery

Muscle relaxation is required to facilitate some surgical procedures. If it is not completely reversed after surgery, the muscle relaxation effects might lead to remaining muscle weakness, breathing problems, lung infection and delayed recovery. Neostigmine and other medications from the same drug family are currently used to restore muscle function after surgery. These medications, however, are not effective in all situations and may cause complications as well. Complications include changes in the heart and lung function, and nausea and vomiting after surgery. Sugammadex is a new medication that is used after surgery in order to reverse the effects of muscle relaxation medications. In this review article we have included 18 trials on the efficacy and safety of sugammadex. The trials included a total of 1321 patients. Sugammadex was shown to be more effective than placebo (no medication) or neostigmine in reversing muscle relaxation caused by neuromuscular blockade during surgery and is relatively safe. Serious complications occurred in less than 1% of the patients who received sugammadex. The results of this review article (specially the safety results) need to be confirmed by future trials on larger patient populations.

Medical and surgical treatment for ocular myasthenia

Ocular myasthenia is a form of myasthenia gravis in which weakened eye muscles cause double vision or drooping eyelids. It accounts for approximately 50% of people with myasthenia gravis. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's own antibodies block the transmission of nerve impulses to muscles, causing fluctuating weakness and muscles that tire easily. Approximately half of people who have ocular myasthenia will go on to develop generalised myasthenia gravis and weakness affecting other muscles. For the majority of people this will be within the first two years of developing ocular symptoms.

See all (6)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...