Home > Drugs A – Z > Naproxen/Esomeprazole (By mouth)

Naproxen/Esomeprazole (By mouth)

Treats pain, arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This medicine contains an NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor (PPI).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Naproxen and esomeprazole combination is used to relieve the symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis in adults and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in children. It is used for patients who have an increased risk for stomach ulcers and who need to take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. Naproxen is a… Read more
Brand names include
Vimovo
Drug classes About this
Analgesic, Antirheumatic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Efficacy and tolerability of naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets compared with non-specific NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors: a systematic review and network analyses

Bibliographic details: Datto C, Hellmund R, Siddiqui MK.  Efficacy and tolerability of naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets compared with non-specific NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors: a systematic review and network analyses. Open Access Rheumatology: Research and Reviews 2013; 5

Drug Class Review: Proton Pump Inhibitors: Final Report Update 5 [Internet]

Proton pump inhibitors decrease secretion of gastric acid. They act by blocking the last enzyme in the system that actively transports acid from gastric parietal cells into the gastrointestinal lumen, hydrogen–potassium adenosine triphosphatase, also known as the proton pump. Omeprazole, the first drug in this class, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 4 other proton pump inhibitors have been introduced: lansoprazole (1995), rabeprazole (1999), pantoprazole (2000), and esomeprazole (2001). In 2003 omeprazole became available over-the-counter in the United States. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of different PPIs.

Analgesics for Osteoarthritis: An Update of the 2006 Comparative Effectiveness Review [Internet]

To update a previous report on the comparative benefits and harms of oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, over-the-counter supplements (chondroitin and glucosamine), and topical agents (NSAIDs and rubefacients, including capsaicin) for osteoarthritis.

See all (7)

Summaries for consumers

Comparing NSAIDs

How do NSAIDs compare in reducing pain?

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...