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Mometasone/Formoterol (By breathing)

Prevents asthma attacks. This medicine contains a steroid.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Mometasone and formoterol is a combination of two medicines that are used to treat asthma and improve lung function. It is used when a patient's asthma has not been controlled sufficiently on other asthma medicines, or when a patient's condition is so severe that more than one medicine is needed every day. This medicine will not relieve an asthma attack that has already started. MometasoneRead more
Brand names include
Dulera
Drug classes About this
Antiasthma, Anti-Inflammatory/Bronchodilator Combination

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Do people with asthma have fewer serious adverse events when taking formoterol and inhaled corticosteroids or salmeterol and inhaled corticosteroids?

Asthma is a condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. When a person with asthma comes into contact with an asthma trigger, their airways become irritated and the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten so that the airways become narrower (bronchoconstriction) and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. Sometimes, sticky mucus or phlegm builds up, which can further narrow the airways. These reactions cause the airways to become narrower and irritated ‐ making it difficult to breathe and leading to coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and tightness in the chest. People with asthma are generally advised to take inhaled steroids to combat the underlying inflammation, but if asthma is still not controlled, current clinical guidelines for people with asthma recommend the introduction of an additional medication to help. A common strategy in these situations is to use a long‐acting beta‐agonists: formoterol or salmeterol. A long‐acting beta‐agonist is an inhaled drug which opens the airways (bronchodilator) making it easier to breath.

Vilanterol and fluticasone furoate for chronic asthma in adults and children

We considered in this review whether the combination of vilanterol (VI) and fluticasone furoate (FF) is better than placebo for people with asthma. We also compared VI and FF with other inhaled steroids and long‐acting beta2‐agonist medications.

Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Evidence Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force [Internet]

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the United States.

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Summaries for consumers

Do people with asthma have fewer serious adverse events when taking formoterol and inhaled corticosteroids or salmeterol and inhaled corticosteroids?

Asthma is a condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. When a person with asthma comes into contact with an asthma trigger, their airways become irritated and the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten so that the airways become narrower (bronchoconstriction) and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. Sometimes, sticky mucus or phlegm builds up, which can further narrow the airways. These reactions cause the airways to become narrower and irritated ‐ making it difficult to breathe and leading to coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and tightness in the chest. People with asthma are generally advised to take inhaled steroids to combat the underlying inflammation, but if asthma is still not controlled, current clinical guidelines for people with asthma recommend the introduction of an additional medication to help. A common strategy in these situations is to use a long‐acting beta‐agonists: formoterol or salmeterol. A long‐acting beta‐agonist is an inhaled drug which opens the airways (bronchodilator) making it easier to breath.

Vilanterol and fluticasone furoate for chronic asthma in adults and children

We considered in this review whether the combination of vilanterol (VI) and fluticasone furoate (FF) is better than placebo for people with asthma. We also compared VI and FF with other inhaled steroids and long‐acting beta2‐agonist medications.

Combination therapy of inhaled steroids and long‐acting beta2‐agonists compared to inhaled steroids alone for people with COPD

Combinations of two classes of medication (long‐acting beta2‐agonists (LABAs) and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) in one inhaler have been developed to treat people with COPD, as this may make it easier to take the medication. Three brands of combined inhaler are currently available: budesonide/formoterol (BDF-'Symbicort'), fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FPS-'Advair' or 'Seretide') and mometasone furoate/formoterol (MF/F-'Dulera'). Both the ICS part and the LABA component of each inhaler are aimed at reducing flare‐ups of COPD, which can be debilitating and costly. In addition, the LABA component may improve day‐to‐day symptoms such as breathlessness and exercise tolerance.

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