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Memantine (By mouth)

Treats dementia associated with Alzheimer disease.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Memantine is used to treat moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. Memantine is not a cure for Alzheimer's disease but it can help people with the disease. Memantine will not cure Alzheimer's disease, and it will not stop the disease from getting worse. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Namenda, Namenda Titration Pack, Namenda XR, Namenda XR Titration Pack
Drug classes About this
Central Nervous System Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Memantine for dementia in people with Down syndrome

Memantine is thought to improve cognitive function and slow the decline of AD over time.The effects of memantine on AD are reported to be beneficial for people with moderate to severe AD in the general population, However, people with DS tend to present with AD at a much younger age than the general population as well as being physically different in terms of size, metabolism and heart rate, and may therefore have different requirements. Results from the one randomised controlled trial for the treatment of dementia in DS are not yet available (expected 2009).

Responder analyses on memantine in Alzheimer’s disease: Executive summary of rapid report A10-06, Version 1.0

The research question of the present investigation is as follows: What is the impact of the responder analyses calculated post hoc by Merz and submitted to the G-BA in the fourth quarter of 2010 on the conclusions of the final report A05-19C (“Memantine in Alzheimer’s disease”)?

Some evidence of efficacy of memantine for dementia

Memantine has a small beneficial, clinically detectable effect on cognitive function and functional decline measured at 6 months in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In patients with mild to moderate dementia, the small beneficial effect on cognition was not clinically detectable in those with vascular dementia and barely detectable in those with AD. It is well tolerated. Slightly fewer patients with moderate to severe AD taking memantine develop agitation, but there is no evidence either way about whether it has an effect on agitation which is already present.

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Summaries for consumers

Memantine for dementia in people with Down syndrome

Memantine is thought to improve cognitive function and slow the decline of AD over time.The effects of memantine on AD are reported to be beneficial for people with moderate to severe AD in the general population, However, people with DS tend to present with AD at a much younger age than the general population as well as being physically different in terms of size, metabolism and heart rate, and may therefore have different requirements. Results from the one randomised controlled trial for the treatment of dementia in DS are not yet available (expected 2009).

Alzheimer's disease: Does memantine help?

Medications containing the drug memantine are supposed to help people who have Alzheimer’s disease remember things and better manage their daily tasks. Studies show that memantine can somewhat delay the worsening of cognitive (mental) performance. Other abilities important in daily life may also last longer.

Some evidence of efficacy of memantine for dementia

Memantine has a small beneficial, clinically detectable effect on cognitive function and functional decline measured at 6 months in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In patients with mild to moderate dementia, the small beneficial effect on cognition was not clinically detectable in those with vascular dementia and barely detectable in those with AD. It is well tolerated. Slightly fewer patients with moderate to severe AD taking memantine develop agitation, but there is no evidence either way about whether it has an effect on agitation which is already present.

See all (20)

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