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Lovastatin (By mouth)

Lowers high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. May reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and blood vessel problems. This is a statin.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Lovastatin is used together with a proper diet to lower cholesterol and triglyceride (fat) levels in the blood. This medicine may help prevent medical problems (eg, chest pain, heart attack, stroke) caused by clogged blood vessels. It may also be used to prevent certain types of heart and blood vessel problems in patients with risk factors for heart problems. Lovastatin belongs to the group of… Read more
Brand names include
Altoprev, Mevacor
Drug classes About this
Antihyperlipidemic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Lipid‐lowering agents for nephrotic syndrome

Nephrotic syndrome is a relatively rare disease in which the kidneys leak protein into the urine. A common early sign is swelling in the feet and face. Other signs and symptoms of nephrotic syndrome include low levels of protein in the blood, and high levels of fats in the blood, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides.

The effect of the timing of statin administration on hyperlipidaemia

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which comprises heart attacks (myocardial infarction), angina, and strokes, is the principal cause of death in the world and is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. High blood cholesterol is linked to CVD events and is an important risk factor. Therefore, decreasing high blood cholesterol is an important way to reduce the chances of suffering a CVD event. Blood cholesterol may come from foods that are high in fat, and is also produced by some of our body’s organs (most of this production is at night (between 12:00 am and 6:00 am).

Perioperative statin use to improve outcomes during and after noncardiac vascular surgery

In July 2012 we searched medical databases for controlled trials of participants who had undergone aortic or arterial surgery and were randomly assigned to either statins or placebo (or standard care). Many vascular surgery patients are already taking statins; therefore we also included trials that randomly assigned participants to different doses of statin. Statin treatment should have been started any time between the decision to operate and performance of the operation and continued for at least 48 hours after the operation. We wanted to investigate the effect of this short‐term statin therapy on the risk of death and cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke within 30 days of surgery. We also considered adverse effects of statins such as muscle pain.

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Summaries for consumers

Lipid‐lowering agents for nephrotic syndrome

Nephrotic syndrome is a relatively rare disease in which the kidneys leak protein into the urine. A common early sign is swelling in the feet and face. Other signs and symptoms of nephrotic syndrome include low levels of protein in the blood, and high levels of fats in the blood, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides.

The effect of the timing of statin administration on hyperlipidaemia

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which comprises heart attacks (myocardial infarction), angina, and strokes, is the principal cause of death in the world and is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. High blood cholesterol is linked to CVD events and is an important risk factor. Therefore, decreasing high blood cholesterol is an important way to reduce the chances of suffering a CVD event. Blood cholesterol may come from foods that are high in fat, and is also produced by some of our body’s organs (most of this production is at night (between 12:00 am and 6:00 am).

Perioperative statin use to improve outcomes during and after noncardiac vascular surgery

In July 2012 we searched medical databases for controlled trials of participants who had undergone aortic or arterial surgery and were randomly assigned to either statins or placebo (or standard care). Many vascular surgery patients are already taking statins; therefore we also included trials that randomly assigned participants to different doses of statin. Statin treatment should have been started any time between the decision to operate and performance of the operation and continued for at least 48 hours after the operation. We wanted to investigate the effect of this short‐term statin therapy on the risk of death and cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke within 30 days of surgery. We also considered adverse effects of statins such as muscle pain.

See all (9)

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