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Loteprednol (Into the eye)

Treats redness, itching, or watering of the eyes caused by several conditions, including allergies, eye infection, herpes zoster, and eye surgery. Also treats eye pain and swelling caused by eye surgery. This medicine is a corticosteroid.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Loteprednol is used to treat eye pain, redness, and swelling caused by certain eye problems or eye surgery. It is also used to temporarily treat itching of the eye caused by a condition known as seasonal allergic conjunctivitis. This medicine belongs to the group of medicines known as corticosteroids (steroids or cortisone-like medicines). This medicine is available only with your doctor's… Read more
Brand names include
Alrex, Lotemax
Drug classes About this
Ophthalmologic Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Topical treatment for blepharokeratoconjunctivitis (BKC) in children

The aim of this Cochrane review was to find out if topical treatment (by eye drops or ointments) for BKC in children improves symptoms and is safe. Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and included one study in this review.

Intraocular pressure effects of common topical steroids for post-cataract inflammation: are they all the same?

The efficacy of topical corticosteroids as ocular anti-inflammatory agents following cataract surgery is well-documented. They also help to prevent a number of complications associated with post-operative ocular inflammation, including corneal edema and cystoid macular edema. However, topical corticosteroids are associated with side effects, such as increased intraocular pressure (IOP). Indeed, corticosteroid-induced ocular hypertension and the potential for steroid-induced glaucoma remain the leading drawbacks of topical corticosteroid therapy. Some individuals are known to experience a high degree of IOP elevation with low doses or short durations of treatment with topical corticosteroids. Careful monitoring of IOP in such individuals is essential. Few randomized, controlled studies are available on the comparative safety and efficacy of common topical corticosteroids in the treatment of post-operative ocular inflammation. Furthermore, the lack of consistent reporting criteria for clinically significant IOP increases across clinical studies makes meaningful comparisons among corticosteroids difficult. This review aims to examine data from available published studies, including studies in steroid responders, to determine whether topical corticosteroids are the same in terms of their effect on IOP. Early generation corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone and prednisolone, are more likely to result in clinically significant increases in IOP. Newer corticosteroids, such as rimexolone and the retro-metabolically designed corticosteroid, loteprednol etabonate, offer similar anti-inflammatory efficacy to older corticosteroids with less effect on IOP. However, randomized controlled trials of newer corticosteroids are needed. The proportion of patients exhibiting an increase of ≥10 mmHg IOP in clinical studies has emerged as the most clinically relevant parameter for ophthalmologists to consider when deciding on which topical corticosteroid to use.

Summaries for consumers

Topical treatment for blepharokeratoconjunctivitis (BKC) in children

The aim of this Cochrane review was to find out if topical treatment (by eye drops or ointments) for BKC in children improves symptoms and is safe. Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and included one study in this review.

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