Home > Drugs A – Z > Levonorgestrel/Ethinyl Estradiol (By...

Levonorgestrel/Ethinyl Estradiol (By mouth)

Prevents pregnancy.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol combination is used to prevent pregnancy. It works by stopping a woman's egg from fully developing each month. The egg can no longer accept a sperm and fertilization (pregnancy) is prevented. No contraceptive method is 100 percent effective. Birth control methods such as having surgery to become sterile or not having sex are more effective than birth control… Read more
Brand names include
Alesse, Alesse-28, Altavera, Amethia, Amethia Lo, Amethyst, Ashlyna, Aubra, Aviane, Camrese, CamreseLo, Chateal, Daysee, Delyla, Enpresse, Enpresse-28, Falessa, Falmina, Introvale, Jolessa, Lessina
Other forms
Absorbed through the skin
Drug classes About this
Contraceptive, Monophasic Contraceptive Combination

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Differences in effectiveness and adverse effects between different types of progestogens combined with ethinyl oestradiol (combined contraceptive pill)

Combined oral contraceptives (COC) have an oestrogen and a progestogen component. The type of progestogen and/or amount of oestrogen or progestogen can vary per pack of oral contraceptive pills. The objective of this review was to compare currently available low‐dose COCs containing different progestogens in terms of pregnancy prevention, bleeding pattern, side effects and discontinuation rates.

Birth control pills with three phases versus one phase

Side effects of birth control pills may keep women from using them as planned. Attempts to decrease side effects led to the three‐phase pill in the 1980s. Pills with three phases provide different amounts of hormones over three weeks. One‐phase pills have the same amount of hormone for three weeks. Whether three‐phase pills lead to more pregnancies is unknown. Nor is it known if the pills give better cycle control or fewer side effects. This review looked at whether three‐phase pills worked as well as one‐phase pills. It also studied whether women had fewer side effects with these pills.

Birth control pills with two phases versus three phases

Side effects of birth control pills may keep women from using them as planned. Attempts to decrease side effects led to the three‐phase pill in the 1980s. Pills with phases provide different amounts of hormones over three weeks. Whether three‐phase pills lead to fewer pregnancies than two‐phase pills is unknown. Nor is it known if the pills give better cycle control or have fewer side effects. This review looked at whether two‐phase pills worked as well as three‐phase pills. We also studied whether women had fewer side effects with these pills.

See all (22)

Summaries for consumers

Differences in effectiveness and adverse effects between different types of progestogens combined with ethinyl oestradiol (combined contraceptive pill)

Combined oral contraceptives (COC) have an oestrogen and a progestogen component. The type of progestogen and/or amount of oestrogen or progestogen can vary per pack of oral contraceptive pills. The objective of this review was to compare currently available low‐dose COCs containing different progestogens in terms of pregnancy prevention, bleeding pattern, side effects and discontinuation rates.

Birth control pills with three phases versus one phase

Side effects of birth control pills may keep women from using them as planned. Attempts to decrease side effects led to the three‐phase pill in the 1980s. Pills with three phases provide different amounts of hormones over three weeks. One‐phase pills have the same amount of hormone for three weeks. Whether three‐phase pills lead to more pregnancies is unknown. Nor is it known if the pills give better cycle control or fewer side effects. This review looked at whether three‐phase pills worked as well as one‐phase pills. It also studied whether women had fewer side effects with these pills.

Birth control pills with two phases versus three phases

Side effects of birth control pills may keep women from using them as planned. Attempts to decrease side effects led to the three‐phase pill in the 1980s. Pills with phases provide different amounts of hormones over three weeks. Whether three‐phase pills lead to fewer pregnancies than two‐phase pills is unknown. Nor is it known if the pills give better cycle control or have fewer side effects. This review looked at whether two‐phase pills worked as well as three‐phase pills. We also studied whether women had fewer side effects with these pills.

See all (11)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...