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Iron Supplement (Oral route, Parenteral route)

Iron is a mineral that the body needs to produce red blood cells. When the body does not get enough iron, it cannot produce the number of normal red blood cells needed to keep you in good health. This condition is called iron deficiency (iron shortage) or iron deficiency anemia.

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Although many people in the U.S. get enough iron from their diet, some must take additional amounts to meet their needs… Read more
Brand names include
Auryxia, Beef,Iron & Wine, Bifera, Elite Iron, Femiron, Feosol, Fer-In-Sol, Fergon, Ferrex 150, Hemocyte, Palafer, Pms-Ferrous Sulfate

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Evidence reviews

Dietary supplements for preventing postnatal depression

Postnatal depression is a common condition that affects women and may impact on their babies. Common symptoms of postnatal depression include fluctuations in mood, mood changes, suicidal ideation and preoccupation with infant well‐being ranging from over‐concern to frank delusions. There is currently not much evidence regarding interventions that might prevent or treat postnatal depression. A diet lacking in certain vitamins, minerals or other nutrients may cause postnatal depression in some women. Correcting this deficiency with dietary supplements might therefore prevent postnatal depression. Examples of possible dietary supplements aimed at preventing postnatal depression include omega‐3 fatty acids, iron, folate, s‐adenosyl‐L‐methionine, vitamin B12 (cobalamin), B6 (pyridoxine), B2 (riboflavin), vitamin D and calcium.

Iron supplements taken one, two or three times a week for preventing anaemia and its consequences in menstruating women

Approximately one out of three non‐pregnant women of reproductive age are anaemic worldwide. Although causes of anaemia are multiple, it very often results from sustained iron deficiency. Being anaemic makes women more likely to suffer infections and to have a diminished physical and work performance. If they become pregnant, they may also have a greater risk of having low birth weight babies and other complications during delivery.

Iron supplements for children living in malaria‐endemic countries

Children living in malarial areas commonly develop anaemia. Long‐term anaemia is thought to delay a child's development and make children more likely to get infections. In areas where anaemia is common, health providers may give iron to prevent anaemia, but there is a concern amongst researchers that this may increase the risk of malaria. It is thought that the iron tablets will increase iron levels in the blood, and this will promote the growth of the Plasmodium parasite that causes malaria. We aimed to assess the effects of oral iron supplementation in children living in countries where malaria is common.

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Summaries for consumers

What are dietary supplements?

“Vitamins strengthen our immune system,” and “Omega 3 is good for your heart”: Dietary supplements are often marketed using a number of different promises, and they are available everywhere, from pharmacies and supermarkets to the internet. But do we really need all of these tablets, powders and capsules? What makes dietary supplements different from medicine and can they also be harmful?

Dietary supplements for preventing postnatal depression

Postnatal depression is a common condition that affects women and may impact on their babies. Common symptoms of postnatal depression include fluctuations in mood, mood changes, suicidal ideation and preoccupation with infant well‐being ranging from over‐concern to frank delusions. There is currently not much evidence regarding interventions that might prevent or treat postnatal depression. A diet lacking in certain vitamins, minerals or other nutrients may cause postnatal depression in some women. Correcting this deficiency with dietary supplements might therefore prevent postnatal depression. Examples of possible dietary supplements aimed at preventing postnatal depression include omega‐3 fatty acids, iron, folate, s‐adenosyl‐L‐methionine, vitamin B12 (cobalamin), B6 (pyridoxine), B2 (riboflavin), vitamin D and calcium.

Iron supplements taken one, two or three times a week for preventing anaemia and its consequences in menstruating women

Approximately one out of three non‐pregnant women of reproductive age are anaemic worldwide. Although causes of anaemia are multiple, it very often results from sustained iron deficiency. Being anaemic makes women more likely to suffer infections and to have a diminished physical and work performance. If they become pregnant, they may also have a greater risk of having low birth weight babies and other complications during delivery.

See all (44)

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