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Gonadorelin (Intravenous route, Injection route)

Gonadorelin is a medicine that is the same as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that is naturally released from the hypothalamus gland. GnRH causes the pituitary gland to release other hormones (luteinizing hormone [LH] and follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]). LH and FSH control development in children and fertility in adults.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Gonadorelin is used to test how well the hypothalamus and the pituitary glands are working. It is also used to cause ovulation (release of an egg from the ovary) in women who do not have regular ovulation and menstrual periods because the hypothalamus gland does not release enough GnRH… Read more
Brand names include
Factrel
Drug classes About this
Endocrine-Metabolic Agent, Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonist

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Adjuvant gonadotropin‐releasing hormone analogues for chemotherapy induced premature ovarian failure in premenopausal women

Chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis for patients with cancer and some non‐cancerous conditions. This treatment, however, is associated with ovarian toxicity. Factors which may affect the risk level of chemotherapy‐induced ovarian damage include the patient's age and type of chemotherapy regime. Gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which are artificial hormone derivatives, can protect the ovaries by suppressing the gonadotrophin hormone, which stimulates ovary function and decreases blood flow, making them less sensitive to the chemotherapy drugs.

Gonadotropin‐releasing hormone agonist versus HCG for oocyte triggering in antagonist‐assisted reproductive technology cycles

We reviewed the evidence on the effects of GnRH agonists on final oocyte maturation triggering in GnRH antagonist IVF/ICSI treatment cycles.

Gonadotrophin‐releasing hormone analogues for pain associated with endometriosis

 Endometriosis is a common condition affecting women of child‐bearing age, and is usually due to the presence of endometrial tissue in places other than the uterus. Common symptoms include pain and infertility. GnRHas are a group of drugs often used to treat endometriosis by decreasing hormone levels. This review found evidence to suggest treatment with a GnRHa improved symptom relief compared with no treatment or placebo. There was no evidence of a statistically significant difference when compared with danazol or intra‐uterine progestagen. However, there more side effects in the GnRHa group compared with the danazol group. There is not enough evidence to make clear if higher or lower doses of GnRHa are better, or which length of treatment is best.

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Summaries for consumers

Adjuvant gonadotropin‐releasing hormone analogues for chemotherapy induced premature ovarian failure in premenopausal women

Chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis for patients with cancer and some non‐cancerous conditions. This treatment, however, is associated with ovarian toxicity. Factors which may affect the risk level of chemotherapy‐induced ovarian damage include the patient's age and type of chemotherapy regime. Gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which are artificial hormone derivatives, can protect the ovaries by suppressing the gonadotrophin hormone, which stimulates ovary function and decreases blood flow, making them less sensitive to the chemotherapy drugs.

Gonadotropin‐releasing hormone agonist versus HCG for oocyte triggering in antagonist‐assisted reproductive technology cycles

We reviewed the evidence on the effects of GnRH agonists on final oocyte maturation triggering in GnRH antagonist IVF/ICSI treatment cycles.

Gonadotrophin‐releasing hormone analogues for pain associated with endometriosis

 Endometriosis is a common condition affecting women of child‐bearing age, and is usually due to the presence of endometrial tissue in places other than the uterus. Common symptoms include pain and infertility. GnRHas are a group of drugs often used to treat endometriosis by decreasing hormone levels. This review found evidence to suggest treatment with a GnRHa improved symptom relief compared with no treatment or placebo. There was no evidence of a statistically significant difference when compared with danazol or intra‐uterine progestagen. However, there more side effects in the GnRHa group compared with the danazol group. There is not enough evidence to make clear if higher or lower doses of GnRHa are better, or which length of treatment is best.

See all (47)

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