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Glyburide (By mouth)

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Glyburide is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by a type of diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) called type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not work properly to store excess sugar and the sugar remains in your bloodstream. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future. Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes, but often… Read more
Brand names include
Diabeta, Euglucon, Glycron, Glynase Pres-Tab, Micronase
Drug classes About this
Hypoglycemic
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Glyburide, Gliclazide or Glimepiride for Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Safety – An Update [Internet]

Sulfonylureas are a class of glucose lowering drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes. These drugs bind to sulfonylurea receptors and stimulate closure of adenosine triphosphate sensitive potassium channels to encourage insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Glyburide (also referred to as glibenclamide), gliclazide, and glimepiride are three second-generation sulfonylurea drugs available in Canada. Glyburide has been associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia and long-term cardiovascular mortality. This may be due to differences in tissue-specific binding of the respective sulfonylureas. A meta-analysis published in 2007 reported an increased risk of hypoglycemia for glyburide compared to other insulin secreting anti-diabetes drugs and alternate sulfonylureas, despite no evidence of improved efficacy. Hypoglycemia can lead to undesirable outcomes including altered mental status, seizures, coma and death. It is more strongly associated with the use of long-acting sulfonylureas (e.g., glyburide and glimepiride) than short-acting sulfonylureas (e.g., gliclazide). The American Geriatrics Society’s Beers Criteria lists a strong recommendation based on high quality evidence that glyburide be avoided in the elderly due to the potential risks. Based on US market pricing, gliclazide is three times higher in price than glyburide, which may contribute to the persistent use of glyburide.

Momordica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus

Mormordica charantia (bitter gourd or bitter melon) is a climbing perennial that is characterized by elongated, warty fruit‐like gourds or cucumbers and is native to the tropical belt. Although momordica charantia is commonly used in traditional medical practices, along with research suggesting its benefits for people with type 2 diabetes, the current evidence does not warrant using the plant in treating this disease. This review of trials found only four studies which had an overall low quality. Three trials showed no significant differences between momordica charantia and placebo or antidiabetic drugs (glibenclamide and metformin) in the blood sugar response. The duration of treatment ranged from four weeks to three months, and altogether 479 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus participated. No trial investigated death from any cause, morbidity, health‐related quality of life or costs. Adverse effects were mostly moderate, including diarrhoea and abdominal pain. However, reporting of adverse effects was incomplete in the included studies. There are many varieties of preparations of momordica charantia, as well as variations in its use as a vegetable. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of the various momordica charantia preparations as well as to further evaluate its use in the diet of diabetic people.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of hypoglycemia and cardiovascular events: a comparison of glyburide with other secretagogues and with insulin

OBJECTIVE: Glyburide is the most widely used sulfonylurea but has unique pharmacodynamic properties that may increase harm. We hypothesized that glyburide causes more hypoglycemia and cardiovascular events than other secretagogues or insulin.

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Summaries for consumers

Momordica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus

Mormordica charantia (bitter gourd or bitter melon) is a climbing perennial that is characterized by elongated, warty fruit‐like gourds or cucumbers and is native to the tropical belt. Although momordica charantia is commonly used in traditional medical practices, along with research suggesting its benefits for people with type 2 diabetes, the current evidence does not warrant using the plant in treating this disease. This review of trials found only four studies which had an overall low quality. Three trials showed no significant differences between momordica charantia and placebo or antidiabetic drugs (glibenclamide and metformin) in the blood sugar response. The duration of treatment ranged from four weeks to three months, and altogether 479 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus participated. No trial investigated death from any cause, morbidity, health‐related quality of life or costs. Adverse effects were mostly moderate, including diarrhoea and abdominal pain. However, reporting of adverse effects was incomplete in the included studies. There are many varieties of preparations of momordica charantia, as well as variations in its use as a vegetable. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of the various momordica charantia preparations as well as to further evaluate its use in the diet of diabetic people.

Oral medication for the treatment of women with gestational diabetes

Globally the number of women being diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing. GDM is an intolerance to glucose leading to high blood sugars, first recognised during pregnancy and usually resolving after birth. Standard care involves lifestyle advice on diet and exercise. Treatment for some women includes oral anti‐diabetic medications, such as metformin and glibenclamide, which are an alternative to, or can be used alongside, insulin to control the blood sugar. This review aimed to investigate benefits of taking oral medication to treat GDM in pregnant women. Another Cochrane Review compares the effects of insulin with oral anti‐diabetic pharmacological therapies ( Brown 2016).

Dulaglutide (Trulicity) for type 2 diabetes: Overview

Dulaglutide (trade name: Trulicity) has been approved since November 2014 for type 2 diabetes mellitus when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate control of blood sugar levels.

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