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Ganciclovir (By injection)

Treats or prevents infections caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
Cytovene IV
Other forms
By mouth, Into the eye, Into the eye
Drug classes About this
Antiviral

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Systematic reviews of ganciclovir versus acyclovir for herpes simplex virus keratitis

Bibliographic details: Li JY, Li SQ.  Systematic reviews of ganciclovir versus acyclovir for herpes simplex virus keratitis. International Eye Science 2014; 14(9): 1590-1593

Antiviral drugs used as protective and preventive therapy reduce CMV disease and CMV‐associated deaths in solid organ transplant recipients

Cytomegalovirus (CMV; a herpes virus) is the most common type of virus detected in people who have received solid organ transplants (kidney, heart, liver, lung and pancreas). CMV disease is a major cause of illness and death during the first six to 12 months after transplantation. Two main strategies to prevent CMV disease have been adopted: protection and prevention (prophylaxis) of viral infections for all organ recipients using antiviral drugs, or 'pre‐emptive therapy' of organ recipients, who develop evidence of CMV infection during routine screening.

Pre‐emptive treatment with antiviral agents can help to reduce the risk of cytomegalovirus disease

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of viral disease in people who have received kidney, heart, liver, lung or pancreas transplants (solid organ transplants). CMV is a major cause of illness and death during the first six months after transplantation. Characteristics of CMV include fever, very low white blood cell counts (leucopenia) and very low numbers of platelets (thrombocytopenia) with or without specific organ involvement.

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Summaries for consumers

Antiviral drugs used as protective and preventive therapy reduce CMV disease and CMV‐associated deaths in solid organ transplant recipients

Cytomegalovirus (CMV; a herpes virus) is the most common type of virus detected in people who have received solid organ transplants (kidney, heart, liver, lung and pancreas). CMV disease is a major cause of illness and death during the first six to 12 months after transplantation. Two main strategies to prevent CMV disease have been adopted: protection and prevention (prophylaxis) of viral infections for all organ recipients using antiviral drugs, or 'pre‐emptive therapy' of organ recipients, who develop evidence of CMV infection during routine screening.

Pre‐emptive treatment with antiviral agents can help to reduce the risk of cytomegalovirus disease

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of viral disease in people who have received kidney, heart, liver, lung or pancreas transplants (solid organ transplants). CMV is a major cause of illness and death during the first six months after transplantation. Characteristics of CMV include fever, very low white blood cell counts (leucopenia) and very low numbers of platelets (thrombocytopenia) with or without specific organ involvement.

Antiviral medicines, interferon, and corneal surface removal in the treatment of herpes simplex virus infection of the eye

We compared different treatments of people's eyes infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV).

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