Home > Drugs A – Z > Everolimus (By mouth)

Everolimus (By mouth)

Treats cancer, including breast cancer, kidney cancer, neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, stomach or bowels, or lungs, and renal angiomyolipoma, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA), and seizures with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Everolimus is used to treat advanced (late-stage) cancers or noncancerous tumors, such as kidney and breast cancer, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA, a brain tumor), renal angiomyolipoma (kidney tumor), and partial-onset seizures (epilepsy) with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), and neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, stomach or bowels, and lungs. It is used for patients who have… Read more
Brand names include
Afinitor, Afinitor Disperz, Zortress
Drug classes About this
Antineoplastic Agent, Immune Suppressant

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Target of rapamycin inhibitors (TOR‐I; sirolimus and everolimus) for primary immunosuppression in kidney transplant recipients

Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for most patients with end‐stage renal disease (ESRD). Strategies to increase donor organ availability and to prolong the transplanted kidney's survival have become priorities in kidney transplantation. This review aimed to evaluate the short and long‐term benefits and harms of sirolimus and everolimus (TOR‐I) when used in primary immunosuppressive regimens for kidney transplant recipients. Thirty three trials investigating the use of TOR‐I in four different settings were evaluated in this review. No differences in the hard‐end points of patient and graft survival were demonstrated for or against TOR‐I in any comparison. Generally surrogate endpoints for graft survival favour TOR‐I (lower risk of acute rejection and higher GFR) and surrogate endpoints for patient outcomes are worsened by TOR‐I (bone marrow suppression, lipid disturbance). Long‐term hard‐endpoint data from methodologically robust randomised trials are still needed.

Everolimus (Afinitor) [Internet]

The objective of this review is to perform a systematic review of the beneficial and harmful effects of everolimus for the treatment of patients three years of age or older with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGAs) associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) that have demonstrated serial growth, who are not candidates for surgical resection and for whom immediate surgery is not required.

Head-to-head comparison of everolimus-eluting stents versus zotarolimus-eluting stents in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Zhang XL, Li R, Wu H, Chen QH, Li GN, Xie J, Xu B.  Head-to-head comparison of everolimus-eluting stents versus zotarolimus-eluting stents in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a meta-analysis. International Journal of Cardiology 2014; 172(1): e203-e20624480184

See all (89)

Summaries for consumers

Target of rapamycin inhibitors (TOR‐I; sirolimus and everolimus) for primary immunosuppression in kidney transplant recipients

Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for most patients with end‐stage renal disease (ESRD). Strategies to increase donor organ availability and to prolong the transplanted kidney's survival have become priorities in kidney transplantation. This review aimed to evaluate the short and long‐term benefits and harms of sirolimus and everolimus (TOR‐I) when used in primary immunosuppressive regimens for kidney transplant recipients. Thirty three trials investigating the use of TOR‐I in four different settings were evaluated in this review. No differences in the hard‐end points of patient and graft survival were demonstrated for or against TOR‐I in any comparison. Generally surrogate endpoints for graft survival favour TOR‐I (lower risk of acute rejection and higher GFR) and surrogate endpoints for patient outcomes are worsened by TOR‐I (bone marrow suppression, lipid disturbance). Long‐term hard‐endpoint data from methodologically robust randomised trials are still needed.

Nivolumab (Opdivo) for advanced renal cell cancer: Overview

The drug nivolumab (trade name: Opdivo) has been approved in Germany since April 2016 for the treatment of advanced renal cell cancer. The drug is an option for adults who have already had treatment.

Lenvatinib (EU: Kisplyx, USA: Lenvima) for advanced renal cell cancer: Overview

The drug lenvatinib (trade name EU: Kisplyx, USA: Lenvima) has been approved in Germany since August 2016 for the treatment of advanced renal cell cancer.

See all (18)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...