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Etodolac (By mouth)

Treats pain and arthritis. This medicine is an NSAID.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Etodolac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat mild to moderate pain, and helps to relieve symptoms of arthritis (osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis), such as inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain. However, this medicine does not cure arthritis and will help you only as long as you continue to take it . This medicine is available only with your doctor's… Read more
Brand names include
Lodine, Lodine XL
Drug classes About this
Analgesic, Antirheumatic, Central Nervous System Agent, Musculoskeletal Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Single dose oral etodolac for acute postoperative pain in adults

Etodolac 200 mg provides a high level of pain relief in about 40% of those with moderate or severe acute postoperative pain. This is fewer than one would expect to see of the same level of pain relief with standard doses of ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac. Higher doses of etodolac may be more effective There were no more adverse events than with placebo in these single dose studies.

Cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and economic evaluation

The objectives were to review the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and economic evaluation

This review evaluated the effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The authors concluded that COX-2 selective NSAIDs were similar to non-selective NSAIDs for the symptomatic relief of these conditions and provided superior GI tolerability. This was a well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions were likely to be reliable.

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Summaries for consumers

Single dose oral etodolac for acute postoperative pain in adults

Etodolac 200 mg provides a high level of pain relief in about 40% of those with moderate or severe acute postoperative pain. This is fewer than one would expect to see of the same level of pain relief with standard doses of ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac. Higher doses of etodolac may be more effective There were no more adverse events than with placebo in these single dose studies.

NSAIDs used for pain relief after surgery may have only small, temporary negative effects on kidney function in adults with normal renal function

Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can be used to try and relieve pain after surgery. However, there have been concerns about the possible harmful effects of these drugs on the kidneys. The review of trials found that NSAIDs can cause small, temporary negative effects on the kidneys in adults, but no one in the trials experienced renal failure or serious kidney problems. These results may not apply to children or adults with decreased kidney function

Non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, including aspirin and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in people taking methotrexate for inflammatory arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review describes what we know from research about any safety issues from using non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, including aspirin, or paracetamol (acetaminophen), or both, along with methotrexate in people with inflammatory arthritis.

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