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Doxylamine (By mouth)

Treats hay fever and allergy symptoms. Also treats insomnia.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
Aldex AN, Health Mart Sleep Aid, Night Sleep Aid, Sleep Aid, Sunmark Sleep Aid, TopCare Sleep Aid, Unisom
Drug classes About this
Respiratory Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Treatments for hyperemesis gravidarum and nausea and vomiting in pregnancy: a systematic review and economic assessment

Study found evidence that some treatments (ginger, vitamin B6, antihistamines, metoclopramide) were better than placebo for mild symptoms of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP), but there is little on the effectiveness of treatments in more severe NVP/hyperemesis gravidarum.

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy

Nausea, retching or dry heaving, and vomiting in early pregnancy are very common and can be very distressing for women. Many treatments are available to women with 'morning sickness', including drugs and complementary and alternative therapies. Because of concerns that taking medications may adversely affect the development of the fetus, this review aimed to examine if these treatments have been found to be effective and safe.

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Summaries for consumers

Pregnancy and birth: What is effective against nausea in pregnancy?

Common medications for nausea and vomiting as well as ginger are often used in pregnancy. But there is only little scientific research on their effectiveness in pregnant women.Nausea and vomiting are common in early pregnancy: At least half of all women are affected by some nausea in the first few months of pregnancy. Although it is called morning sickness, and it can actually be worse in the mornings, it may last all through the day too. Nausea and vomiting can be difficult to deal with for some weeks, but they usually do not have any consequences for the mother and her child.It is not known why pregnancy is so often accompanied by these symptoms. One theory is that it is due to hormonal changes. It is unknown whether stress or psychological problems cause or worsen the symptoms.Morning sickness typically starts between the sixth and eighth week of pregnancy and is gone by the end of 16 weeks. For some women, it will go on even longer. It is not only a problem because it makes pregnant women feel so unwell – it can also be more difficult to eat a healthy diet or to stay well-nourished.About 1 out of 100 women experience a severe form of nausea with frequent and violent vomiting. This can lead to weight and fluid loss which can also endanger the child and needs to be treated in hospital. There, the woman will receive medication and her body will be supplied with fluids.

Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy

Nausea, retching or dry heaving, and vomiting in early pregnancy are very common and can be very distressing for women. Many treatments are available to women with 'morning sickness', including drugs and complementary and alternative therapies. Because of concerns that taking medications may adversely affect the development of the fetus, this review aimed to examine if these treatments have been found to be effective and safe.

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