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Doxycycline (On the gums)

Treats periodontitis (infection of the gum). This medicine is a tetracycline antibiotic.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Doxycycline is used to help treat periodontal disease (a disease of your gums). Periodontal disease is caused by bacteria growing beneath the gum line. Doxycycline works by keeping the number of bacteria from growing. Lowering the amount of bacteria helps to reduce inflammation and swelling in your mouth, and the amount of bleeding around the teeth. Doxycycline is placed in deep gum pockets next… Read more
Brand names include
Atridox
Other forms
By injection, By mouth
Drug classes About this
Antibacterial

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Doxycycline for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of doxycycline on osteoarthritis. After searching for all relevant studies, they found two studies with 663 people.

Doxycycline plus ivermectin for preventing and treating river blindness (onchocerciasis)

We reviewed the evidence on the effect of adding doxycycline to ivermectin, the usual treatment for people with river blindness (RB). RB also is known as onchocerciasis.

Antibiotics for the treatment of leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is a common disease both in the developed and developing world. It is caused by a bacteria spread by the urine of animals. People travelling, agricultural field workers, hunters, homeless, and others with close animal contact are groups that, in particular, can get leptospirosis. Like many common infections, most people infected with this disease do not feel sick. When people do feel sick, in some instances up to 1 out of every 10 people have died. Whether or not antibiotics should be used, and if used which antibiotic should be used have been matters for debate for many years. This review identified and assessed seven clinical trials that tested antibiotics in patients sick with leptospirosis. Four of these trials compared intravenous penicillin to a placebo. Three of the trials looked at differences between different antibiotics. All trials had high risk of systematic errors (bias) and of random errors (play of chance). When looked at together, these trials do not answer the basic questions about whether or not antibiotics should be used. Part of the reason for this is that there is a wide range of severity among people ill with the disease. Additional randomised clinical trials are needed. Nonetheless, these trials suggest that antibiotics administered to patients who are sick with leptospirosis may make patients feel better two days earlier than they otherwise would have improved. However, it is also possible that when patients are severely ill, penicillin therapy might increase the risk of death or dialysis in comparison to those who receive no antibiotics. Other antibiotics have not been tested in this way. Despite the lack of evidence, if a clinician chooses to treat leptospirosis with an antibiotic, there does not seem to be any difference between the appropriate use of intravenous penicillin, intravenous cephalosporin, doxycyline, or azithromycin. But, for this they have not been tested to the same extent as intravenous penicillin.

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Summaries for consumers

Doxycycline for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of doxycycline on osteoarthritis. After searching for all relevant studies, they found two studies with 663 people.

Doxycycline plus ivermectin for preventing and treating river blindness (onchocerciasis)

We reviewed the evidence on the effect of adding doxycycline to ivermectin, the usual treatment for people with river blindness (RB). RB also is known as onchocerciasis.

Antibiotics for the treatment of leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is a common disease both in the developed and developing world. It is caused by a bacteria spread by the urine of animals. People travelling, agricultural field workers, hunters, homeless, and others with close animal contact are groups that, in particular, can get leptospirosis. Like many common infections, most people infected with this disease do not feel sick. When people do feel sick, in some instances up to 1 out of every 10 people have died. Whether or not antibiotics should be used, and if used which antibiotic should be used have been matters for debate for many years. This review identified and assessed seven clinical trials that tested antibiotics in patients sick with leptospirosis. Four of these trials compared intravenous penicillin to a placebo. Three of the trials looked at differences between different antibiotics. All trials had high risk of systematic errors (bias) and of random errors (play of chance). When looked at together, these trials do not answer the basic questions about whether or not antibiotics should be used. Part of the reason for this is that there is a wide range of severity among people ill with the disease. Additional randomised clinical trials are needed. Nonetheless, these trials suggest that antibiotics administered to patients who are sick with leptospirosis may make patients feel better two days earlier than they otherwise would have improved. However, it is also possible that when patients are severely ill, penicillin therapy might increase the risk of death or dialysis in comparison to those who receive no antibiotics. Other antibiotics have not been tested in this way. Despite the lack of evidence, if a clinician chooses to treat leptospirosis with an antibiotic, there does not seem to be any difference between the appropriate use of intravenous penicillin, intravenous cephalosporin, doxycyline, or azithromycin. But, for this they have not been tested to the same extent as intravenous penicillin.

See all (18)

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