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Dextromethorphan/Quinidine (By mouth)

Treats emotional incontinence or uncontrollable crying or laughing.

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Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Dextromethorphan and quinidine combination is used to treat a rare condition called pseudobulbar affect (PBA) or emotional incontinence. PBA is a nervous system disorder that is characterized by uncontrollable, sudden, and frequent episodes of crying or laughing. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Nuedexta
Drug classes About this
Central Nervous System Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Cannabinoid Buccal Spray for Chronic Non-Cancer or Neuropathic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines [Internet]

Chronic pain is a complex, severe and debilitating condition which can lead to a considerable reduction in function and quality of life. Patients may present with different forms of chronic pain resulting from a number of identifiable causes, including pain due to lesion or dysfunction of the nerves, spinal cord or brain (neuropathic pain), or persistent pain caused by other non-malignant conditions, such as low-back pain or pain due to inflammation of various arthritic conditions. The prevalence of chronic non-cancer pain or neuropathic pain among Canadian adults is not well known. However, prevalence estimates using large, population-based questionnaires have shown that 4% to 8% of the general population in the developed world experiences neuropathic pain, suggesting that approximately two million Canadians may be affected by this disabling condition. Chronic pain is of particular concern among Canadians aged 65 years and older; based on cross-sectional data from the 1996/1997 National Population Health Survey and the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, chronic pain was estimated to affect 27% and 38% of seniors living in households and health care institutions, respectively.

Treatment for cramps in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease

A cramp is a sudden, involuntary painful contraction of a muscle. Many people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), experience cramps during the course of the disease. These range from mild cramps that do not affect daily activities and sleep, through to very severe, painful cramps. Some medications that are used to treat cramps in people with no medical condition or with conditions other than ALS have been tested in ALS clinical trials. These medicines include vitamin E, creatine, quinidine, and gabapentin. Other medications such as quinine sulfate, magnesium, lioresal, dantrolene, clonazepam, diphenylhydantoin, and gabapentin have been used to treat cramps in people with ALS but their effectiveness is unknown. In 2006 and 2010 the US Food and Drugs Administration issued warnings concerning the use of quinine sulfate, which was the previously most widely prescribed medication for cramps in the US. This review sought to find out how effective medications and physical treatments for cramps are for people with ALS. The reviewers identified 20 randomised controlled trials in people with ALS comprising a total of 4789 participants. Only one trial, of the drug tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), directly investigated the effectiveness of an intervention for cramps. Thirteen randomised controlled ALS trials investigated cramps secondarily among other variables. The medications comprised vitamin E, baclofen, riluzole, L‐threonine, xaliproden, indinavir, and memantine. Six randomised controlled ALS trials investigated cramps as adverse events. The medications comprised creatine, gabapentin, dextromethorphan, quinidine and lithium. None of the 20 studies could demonstrate any benefit, but the studies were small. Current evidence on the treatment of cramps in ALS is lacking and more research is needed.

Multiple Sclerosis: Management of Multiple Sclerosis in Primary and Secondary Care

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an acquired chronic immune-mediated inflammatory condition of the central nervous system (CNS), affecting both the brain and spinal cord. It affects approximately 100,000 people in the UK. It is the commonest cause of serious physical disability in adults of working age.

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Summaries for consumers

Treatment for cramps in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease

A cramp is a sudden, involuntary painful contraction of a muscle. Many people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), experience cramps during the course of the disease. These range from mild cramps that do not affect daily activities and sleep, through to very severe, painful cramps. Some medications that are used to treat cramps in people with no medical condition or with conditions other than ALS have been tested in ALS clinical trials. These medicines include vitamin E, creatine, quinidine, and gabapentin. Other medications such as quinine sulfate, magnesium, lioresal, dantrolene, clonazepam, diphenylhydantoin, and gabapentin have been used to treat cramps in people with ALS but their effectiveness is unknown. In 2006 and 2010 the US Food and Drugs Administration issued warnings concerning the use of quinine sulfate, which was the previously most widely prescribed medication for cramps in the US. This review sought to find out how effective medications and physical treatments for cramps are for people with ALS. The reviewers identified 20 randomised controlled trials in people with ALS comprising a total of 4789 participants. Only one trial, of the drug tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), directly investigated the effectiveness of an intervention for cramps. Thirteen randomised controlled ALS trials investigated cramps secondarily among other variables. The medications comprised vitamin E, baclofen, riluzole, L‐threonine, xaliproden, indinavir, and memantine. Six randomised controlled ALS trials investigated cramps as adverse events. The medications comprised creatine, gabapentin, dextromethorphan, quinidine and lithium. None of the 20 studies could demonstrate any benefit, but the studies were small. Current evidence on the treatment of cramps in ALS is lacking and more research is needed.

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