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Dapsone (On the skin)

Treats acne.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Dapsone topical is used to treat acne. It works by killing the bacteria that cause acne and by keeping the skin pores clean. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Aczone, Dapsone
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Antiacne

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Dapsone as an oral corticosteroid sparing agent for asthma

Some asthma sufferers rely on oral corticosteroids to control their disease. Corticosteroids help reduce the inflammation of the airways associated with asthma. Long‐term use of these drugs has serious side effects, so other ways to reduce the need for corticosteroids are sometimes tried. Dapsone does have anti‐inflammatory properties, and may have an effect on asthma symptoms and steroid doses taken. However, this review found that there was no evidence for or against the use of dapsone in the treatment of corticosteroid‐dependent asthmatic patients. More research is needed.

Tramadol for the Management of Pain in Adult Patients: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to review the clinical effectiveness of tramadol or tramadol combinations for the management of pain in adults. This report is an update of a previous Rapid Response Report (Reference List) and includes additional details.

The feasibility of determining the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medication organisation devices compared with usual care for older people in a community setting: systematic review, stakeholder focus groups and feasibility randomised controlled trial

The study found that previous research on medication organization devices (MOD) was mostly of poor quality, and that the relationship between adherence to a MOD and health outcomes was unclear. Future work is needed to examine this relationship and whether MOD may cause medication-related adverse events.

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Summaries for consumers

Dapsone as an oral corticosteroid sparing agent for asthma

Some asthma sufferers rely on oral corticosteroids to control their disease. Corticosteroids help reduce the inflammation of the airways associated with asthma. Long‐term use of these drugs has serious side effects, so other ways to reduce the need for corticosteroids are sometimes tried. Dapsone does have anti‐inflammatory properties, and may have an effect on asthma symptoms and steroid doses taken. However, this review found that there was no evidence for or against the use of dapsone in the treatment of corticosteroid‐dependent asthmatic patients. More research is needed.

Interventions for mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin, eyes and mouth)

Mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita are rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin and mucous membranes (eyes and mouth). They can result in scarring, which may lead to disabling and life threatening complications. Treatments include corticosteroids, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide to suppress the immune system, and less toxic drugs such as antibiotics. These diseases often progress despite treatment. There is some evidence that mucous membrane pemphigoid involving the eyes may respond better to treatment with cyclophosphamide combined with corticosteroids, compared to treatment with corticosteroids alone. Cyclophosphamide is, however, associated with potentially severe adverse effects. Dapsone may help moderate disease. More research is needed to identify the most effective treatment options.There is not enough reliable evidence about treatments for the rare blistering diseases, mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

Interventions for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus

This review of clinical trials aimed to find out which is the most effective and safest treatment option for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus.

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