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Danaparoid (Subcutaneous route)

Danaparoid is used to prevent deep venous thrombosis, a condition in which harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels of the legs. These blood clots can travel to the lungs and can become lodged in the blood vessels of the lungs, causing a condition called pulmonary embolism. Danaparoid is used for several days after hip replacement surgery, while you are unable to walk. It is during this time that blood clots are most likely to form. Danaparoid also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Danaparoid was available only with your doctor's prescription. Organon, Inc… Read more
Brand names include
Orgaran
Drug classes About this
Anticoagulant, Low Molecular Weight Heparin

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery [Internet]

This is an evidence report prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) examining the comparative efficacy and safety of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in major orthopedic surgery (total hip replacement [THR], total knee replacement [TKR], and hip fracture surgery [HFS]) and other nonmajor orthopedic surgeries (knee arthroscopy, injuries distal to the hip requiring surgery, and elective spine surgery).

Haematological interventions for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation during pregnancy and postpartum

Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to establish the beneficial and harmful effects of drugs altering blood clotting for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in pregnant women and following birth is lacking.

Prevention of occlusion of small veins in the liver after blood‐forming stem cell transplantation

We reviewed evidence about the effects of medications to prevent blockage of small veins in the liver (veno‐occlusive disease or VOD) in people who undergo blood‐forming stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

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Summaries for consumers

Haematological interventions for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation during pregnancy and postpartum

Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to establish the beneficial and harmful effects of drugs altering blood clotting for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in pregnant women and following birth is lacking.

Prevention of occlusion of small veins in the liver after blood‐forming stem cell transplantation

We reviewed evidence about the effects of medications to prevent blockage of small veins in the liver (veno‐occlusive disease or VOD) in people who undergo blood‐forming stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

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