Home > Drugs A – Z > Cyclosporine (Into the eye)

Cyclosporine (Into the eye)

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Cyclosporine eye drops is used to increase tear production in patients who have a certain eye condition (eg, keratoconjunctivitis sicca). It belongs to a class of medicines known as immunosuppressants. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Restasis, Restasis Multidose
Other forms
By injection, By mouth
Drug classes About this
Anti-Inflammatory

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Cyclosporine for treating rheumatoid arthritis

This review included three trials with a total of 318 patients. A statistically significant decrease in the number of tender and swollen joints was found for patients taking cyclosporine when compared to those taking placebo. Significant improvements in pain and function were also found for those patients taking cyclosporine. More side effects occurred in the cyclosporine group compared to the placebo group.

Treatment with cyclosporine raises blood pressure

Cyclosporine is an immunosuppressive agent discovered in 1972. It was first used to prevent rejection after organ transplantation and more recently, for management of autoimmune diseases. Common side effects associated with cyclosporine therapy are nephrotoxicity and hypertension. To observe the magnitude of elevated blood pressure caused by cyclosporine compared to placebo, we searched the available scientific literature. We identified 17 trials that met our inclusion criteria and had extractable data.

Cyclosporine for treatment of active Crohn's disease

The results of this review demonstrate that low dose oral cyclosporine is not effective for treatment of active Crohn's disease. Studies indicate that Crohn's patients treated with low dose (5 mg/kg/day) oral cyclosporine could experience side effects including kidney problems. Therefore the use of this medication for the treatment of chronic active Crohn's disease is not advisable. Higher oral doses and injections of cyclosporine have not been sufficiently evaluated. Larger doses of cyclosporine are not likely to be useful for the long‐term management of Crohn's disease due to the risk of kidney damage and the availability of other proven medications.

See all (210)

Summaries for consumers

Cyclosporine for treating rheumatoid arthritis

This review included three trials with a total of 318 patients. A statistically significant decrease in the number of tender and swollen joints was found for patients taking cyclosporine when compared to those taking placebo. Significant improvements in pain and function were also found for those patients taking cyclosporine. More side effects occurred in the cyclosporine group compared to the placebo group.

Treatment with cyclosporine raises blood pressure

Cyclosporine is an immunosuppressive agent discovered in 1972. It was first used to prevent rejection after organ transplantation and more recently, for management of autoimmune diseases. Common side effects associated with cyclosporine therapy are nephrotoxicity and hypertension. To observe the magnitude of elevated blood pressure caused by cyclosporine compared to placebo, we searched the available scientific literature. We identified 17 trials that met our inclusion criteria and had extractable data.

Cyclosporine for treatment of active Crohn's disease

The results of this review demonstrate that low dose oral cyclosporine is not effective for treatment of active Crohn's disease. Studies indicate that Crohn's patients treated with low dose (5 mg/kg/day) oral cyclosporine could experience side effects including kidney problems. Therefore the use of this medication for the treatment of chronic active Crohn's disease is not advisable. Higher oral doses and injections of cyclosporine have not been sufficiently evaluated. Larger doses of cyclosporine are not likely to be useful for the long‐term management of Crohn's disease due to the risk of kidney damage and the availability of other proven medications.

See all (64)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...