Home > Drugs A – Z > Clobetasol Propionate (On the skin)

Clobetasol Propionate (On the skin)

Treats psoriasis and irritation from skin diseases. This medicine is a corticosteroid.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Clobetasol topical is used to help relieve redness, itching, swelling, or other discomfort caused by skin conditions. The solution are used for scalp problems, the foam is used for mild to moderate plaque psoriasis, the cream, lotion, and spray are used for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, and the foam and shampoo are used for moderate to severe scalp psoriasis. This medicine is a… Read more
Brand names include
Clobetasol Propionate, Clobevate, Clobex, Clodan, Cormax, Cormax Scalp Application, Dermovate, Dermovate Scalp Application, Embeline, Embeline E, Embeline Scalp Application, Impoyz, Med Clobetasol Scalp Application, Olux, Olux-E, Olux/Olux-E Complete Pack, Ratio-Clobetasol, Temovate, Temovate E
Other forms
On the skin
Drug classes About this
Corticosteroid, Very Strong

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Topical treatments for genital lichen sclerosus

Lichen sclerosus is a chronic skin disease that mostly affects adult women, but also men and children. It mainly occurs in the genital area and around the anus. Affected women and girls frequently report itching, pain, and burning in the involved area. Scarring after inflammation may cause fusion of the vaginal lips, narrowing of the vaginal opening, and burying of the clitoris. Sex is often painful, less pleasurable, or impossible because of the pain. Lichen sclerosus in men and boys may cause tightening of the foreskin, leading to difficulty in passing urine or painful erection. Pain on opening the bowels may also be present, causing constipation, especially in children. Treating this disease is beneficial as the symptoms can be relieved, and further damage to the genital area and around the anus may be prevented. Various topical treatments for lichen sclerosus have been devised. This review aimed to identify which topical treatments are effective and safe.

Relative efficacy and interchangeability of various clobetasol propionate vehicles in the management of steroid-responsive dermatoses

This review compared lotion and cream preparations containing clobetasol propionate for treating psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. The author concluded that a lotion is as effective as cream and emollient cream preparations, and is as well tolerated. The significant shortcomings in the review methods mean that the conclusion should be treated with caution.

Treatments for bullous pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease in the West. Incidence figures are not available for most parts of the world but BP appears to be rarer in the Far East. Bullous pemphigoid is usually a disease of the elderly but it can also affect younger people and children. Both sexes are similarly affected. While BP usually resolves within five years, there is a moderate death rate associated with the disease and its treatment. Oral corticosteroid drugs are the most common treatment, but may be associated with serious adverse effects, including some deaths. The most common adverse effects of oral steroids, include weight gain and high blood pressure. Long‐term use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and decreased bone density. Topical steroids are also associated with adverse effects, such as thinning of the skin and easy bruising. The risk of experiencing adverse effects of topical steroids depends on the strength of the steroid, how long it is used for, which area of the body it is applied to, and the kind of skin problem; if a high‐strength, potent steroid is used, enough may be absorbed through the skin to cause adverse effects in the rest of the body.

See all (22)

Summaries for consumers

Topical treatments for genital lichen sclerosus

Lichen sclerosus is a chronic skin disease that mostly affects adult women, but also men and children. It mainly occurs in the genital area and around the anus. Affected women and girls frequently report itching, pain, and burning in the involved area. Scarring after inflammation may cause fusion of the vaginal lips, narrowing of the vaginal opening, and burying of the clitoris. Sex is often painful, less pleasurable, or impossible because of the pain. Lichen sclerosus in men and boys may cause tightening of the foreskin, leading to difficulty in passing urine or painful erection. Pain on opening the bowels may also be present, causing constipation, especially in children. Treating this disease is beneficial as the symptoms can be relieved, and further damage to the genital area and around the anus may be prevented. Various topical treatments for lichen sclerosus have been devised. This review aimed to identify which topical treatments are effective and safe.

Treatments for bullous pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease in the West. Incidence figures are not available for most parts of the world but BP appears to be rarer in the Far East. Bullous pemphigoid is usually a disease of the elderly but it can also affect younger people and children. Both sexes are similarly affected. While BP usually resolves within five years, there is a moderate death rate associated with the disease and its treatment. Oral corticosteroid drugs are the most common treatment, but may be associated with serious adverse effects, including some deaths. The most common adverse effects of oral steroids, include weight gain and high blood pressure. Long‐term use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and decreased bone density. Topical steroids are also associated with adverse effects, such as thinning of the skin and easy bruising. The risk of experiencing adverse effects of topical steroids depends on the strength of the steroid, how long it is used for, which area of the body it is applied to, and the kind of skin problem; if a high‐strength, potent steroid is used, enough may be absorbed through the skin to cause adverse effects in the rest of the body.

Topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys

Phimosis is a condition where the foreskin cannot be fully drawn back (retracted) over the penis. Phimosis is normal at birth and often self‐corrects without needing treatment during the first three to four years of life; only 10% of three year old boys have phimosis. This is known as congenital phimosis. Phimosis can also be caused by scarring of the skin protecting the head of the penis that is caused when the foreskin cannot be retracted. Phimosis caused by scarring is estimated to occur among 0.6% to 1.5% of boys less than 18 years of age, but this type of phimosis seldom occurs among boys under five years of age. Making a distinction between types of phimosis can sometimes be difficult.

See all (10)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...