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Ciclopirox (On the skin)

Treats skin infections caused by fungus, such as ringworm, athlete's foot, or dandruff. Belongs to a class of drugs called antifungals.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Ciclopirox is used to treat infections caused by fungus. It works by killing the fungus or preventing its growth. Ciclopirox cream, gel, or lotion are applied to the skin to treat: ringworm of the body (tinea corporis); ringworm of the foot (tinea pedis; athlete's foot); ringworm of the groin (tinea cruris; jock itch); “sun fungus” (tinea versicolor; pityriasis versicolor); and certain other… Read more
Brand names include
CNL8, Ciclodan, Ciclodan Cream Kit, Ciclopirox Topical Solution 8%, Ciclopirox Treatment Kit, Loprox, Loprox TS, Penlac, Penlac Nail Lacquer
Drug classes About this
Antifungal

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Antifungal treatments applied to the skin to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition found throughout the world, with rashes with varying degrees of redness, scaling and itching. It affects people of both sexes but is more common among men. The disease usually starts after puberty and can lead to personal discomfort and cosmetic concerns when rashes occur at prominent skin sites. Drugs that act against moulds, also called antifungal agents, have been commonly used on their own or in combination.

Efinaconazole for Fungal Nail Infections: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-effectiveness, and Guidelines [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to review the clinical efficacy and safety, and cost-effectiveness of efinaconazole for the treatment of fungal nail infections and to review the evidence-based guidelines regarding the treatment of fungal nail infections.

Diabetic Foot Problems: Prevention and Management

Despite the publication of strategies on commissioning specialist services for preventing and managing diabetic foot problems, there is variation in practice across different NHS settings, and amputation rates still vary up to fourfold in the UK.

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Summaries for consumers

Nail fungus: Polish, cream or tablets?

Nail fungus can be very persistent. Topical treatment with nail polish may last as long as one year. Tablets for treating fungal nail infections usually have to be taken for several weeks or months. They are much more effective than topical treatments, but they have more side effects. Crumbly nails and a whitish-yellowish to brownish discoloration are typical signs of nail fungus. The nails may also become thicker and change shape. The affected part of the nail can become detached from the nail bed. Treatment options for nail fungus include nail polishes and creams as well as tablets. Nail polishes and creams are available in pharmacies without a prescription.

Antifungal treatments applied to the skin to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition found throughout the world, with rashes with varying degrees of redness, scaling and itching. It affects people of both sexes but is more common among men. The disease usually starts after puberty and can lead to personal discomfort and cosmetic concerns when rashes occur at prominent skin sites. Drugs that act against moulds, also called antifungal agents, have been commonly used on their own or in combination.

Nail fungus: Overview

Nail fungus is very common. Experts think that it often develops from untreated athlete's foot. It takes time to get rid of brittle, discolored, or thickened nails. Local treatment using nail polish can take up to a year. Tablets take effect more quickly, but have more side effects.

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