Home > Drugs A – Z > Chlorothiazide (By injection)

Chlorothiazide (By injection)

Treats edema. This medicine is a diuretic (water pill) and an antihypertensive.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Chlorothiazide is used to treat fluid retention (edema) that is caused by congestive heart failure, severe liver disease (cirrhosis), kidney disease, or from treatment with a steroid or hormone medicine. Chlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic. It reduces the amount of water in the body by increasing the flow of urine, which helps reduce fluid retention (edema). This medicine is available only with… Read more
Brand names include
Chlorothiazide Sodium Novaplus, Diuril Sodium, PremierPro RX Chlorothiazide Sodium, Sodium Diuril
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Cardiovascular Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Diuretics for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants

There is not enough data to support the routine use of diuretics for respiratory distress syndrome in newborn babies. Diuretics are drugs that increase the production of urine by encouraging salt and water to be released from the kidneys. When newborn babies have respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), their lungs may also contain excess fluid that can cause breathing problems. Babies with RDS sometimes may also have a reduced urine output. Using diuretics in these babies may improve lung or kidney function transiently, but may also increase cardiovascular complications. The review of trials did not find enough evidence supporting the routine use of diuretics in these infants.

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

Hypertension in Pregnancy: The Management of Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

See all (7)

Summaries for consumers

Diuretics for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants

There is not enough data to support the routine use of diuretics for respiratory distress syndrome in newborn babies. Diuretics are drugs that increase the production of urine by encouraging salt and water to be released from the kidneys. When newborn babies have respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), their lungs may also contain excess fluid that can cause breathing problems. Babies with RDS sometimes may also have a reduced urine output. Using diuretics in these babies may improve lung or kidney function transiently, but may also increase cardiovascular complications. The review of trials did not find enough evidence supporting the routine use of diuretics in these infants.

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...