Home > Drugs A – Z > Ceftriaxone (By injection)

Ceftriaxone (By injection)

Treats infections. This medicine is a cephalosporin antibiotic.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Ceftriaxone is used to treat bacterial infections in many different parts of the body. This medicine is also given before certain types of surgery to prevent infections. Ceftriaxone belongs to the class of medicines known as cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria or preventing their growth. However, this medicine will not work for colds, flu, or other virus infections. This… Read more
Brand names include
Ceftri-IM Injection, Ceftrisol Plus, PremierPro Rx cefTRIAXone, Rocephin, cefTRIAXone Novaplus
Drug classes About this
Antibiotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Short course antibiotics for healthy children with uncomplicated acute otitis media

Acute otitis media (AOM), or middle ear infection, is a common childhood illness, with more than half of all children having at least one infection by the time they are seven. Although otitis media often resolves without treatment, it is frequently treated with antibiotics. The length of treatment varies widely. This review of 49 trials found that treating children with a short course (less than seven days) of antibiotics, compared to treatment with a long course (seven days or greater) of antibiotics, increases the likelihood of treatment failure in the short term. No differences are seen one month later. The amount of gastrointestinal adverse events decreased with a shorter course of antibiotics.

Antibiotics to treat suspected cases meningitis due to infection with meningococcus before confirmation of diagnosis

We wanted to know if people suspected to have inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) due to infection with the meningococcal bacteria should be given antibiotics before the diagnosis is confirmed in order to prevent death or disability. We found one relevant study.

Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

In humans, a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease. People become infected when bitten by ticks carrying the bacterium. The person may experience symptoms in the joints, skin, muscles, and nervous system (peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord), the brain, and the spinal cord). Without antibiotic treatment, neurological Lyme disease either may resolve or cause long‐term problems. Neurological Lyme disease differs between Europe and the United States, probably because of differences in B. burgdorferi. Limited information exists about which antibiotics are better for the treatment of neurological Lyme disease.

See all (74)

Summaries for consumers

Short course antibiotics for healthy children with uncomplicated acute otitis media

Acute otitis media (AOM), or middle ear infection, is a common childhood illness, with more than half of all children having at least one infection by the time they are seven. Although otitis media often resolves without treatment, it is frequently treated with antibiotics. The length of treatment varies widely. This review of 49 trials found that treating children with a short course (less than seven days) of antibiotics, compared to treatment with a long course (seven days or greater) of antibiotics, increases the likelihood of treatment failure in the short term. No differences are seen one month later. The amount of gastrointestinal adverse events decreased with a shorter course of antibiotics.

Antibiotics to treat suspected cases meningitis due to infection with meningococcus before confirmation of diagnosis

We wanted to know if people suspected to have inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) due to infection with the meningococcal bacteria should be given antibiotics before the diagnosis is confirmed in order to prevent death or disability. We found one relevant study.

Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

In humans, a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease. People become infected when bitten by ticks carrying the bacterium. The person may experience symptoms in the joints, skin, muscles, and nervous system (peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord), the brain, and the spinal cord). Without antibiotic treatment, neurological Lyme disease either may resolve or cause long‐term problems. Neurological Lyme disease differs between Europe and the United States, probably because of differences in B. burgdorferi. Limited information exists about which antibiotics are better for the treatment of neurological Lyme disease.

See all (13)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...