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Cefonicid (By injection)

Treats infections caused by bacteria. Belongs to a class of drugs called cephalosporin antibiotics.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Drug classes About this
Antibiotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

A cost-effectiveness modelling study of strategies to reduce risk of infection following primary hip replacement based on a systematic review

The model suggested that a particular strategy (systematic antibiotics, antibiotic impregnated cement and conventional ventilation) would prevent many deep infections and save the NHS the most money

Surgical Site Infection: Prevention and Treatment of Surgical Site Infection

Infections that occur in the wound created by an invasive surgical procedure are generally referred to as surgical site infections (SSIs). SSIs are one of the most important causes of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). A prevalence survey undertaken in 2006 suggested that approximately 8% of patients in hospital in the UK have an HCAI. SSIs accounted for 14% of these infections and nearly 5% of patients who had undergone a surgical procedure were found to have developed an SSI. However, prevalence studies tend to underestimate SSI because many of these infections occur after the patient has been discharged from hospital.

Global Guidelines for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection

Surgical site infections are caused by bacteria that get in through incisions made during surgery. They threaten the lives of millions of patients each year and contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance. In low- and middle-income countries, 11% of patients who undergo surgery are infected in the process. In Africa, up to 20% of women who have a caesarean section contract a wound infection, compromising their own health and their ability to care for their babies. But surgical site infections are not just a problem for poor countries. In the United States, they contribute to patients spending more than 400 000 extra days in hospital at a cost of an additional US$ 10 billion per year.

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