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Bromfenac (Into the eye)

Treats eye pain and swelling after cataract surgery. This medicine is an NSAID.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Bromfenac ophthalmic (eye) solution is used to treat pain or swelling of the eye following cataract surgery. This medicine is a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Bromday, Bromsite, Prolensa, Xibrom
Drug classes About this
Anti-Inflammatory

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

A systematic review of NSAIDs withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity: lessons learned from the bromfenac experience

The authors concluded that there were limited safety data from controlled clinical trials about the withdrawn non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs bromfenac, benoxaprofen and ibufenac. The authors' conclusions about such limited data appear to be supported by the evidence presented, but poor reporting means it is not possible to assess the reliability of these conclusions.

Topical non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory agents for diabetic cystoid macular oedema

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs for diabetic cystoid macular oedema.

Prophylactic non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the prevention of macular oedema after cataract surgery

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out if NSAID eye drops can prevent a sight‐threatening complication of cataract surgery (swelling at the back of the eye, known as macular oedema). Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and found 34 studies.

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Summaries for consumers

Topical non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory agents for diabetic cystoid macular oedema

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs for diabetic cystoid macular oedema.

Prophylactic non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the prevention of macular oedema after cataract surgery

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out if NSAID eye drops can prevent a sight‐threatening complication of cataract surgery (swelling at the back of the eye, known as macular oedema). Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and found 34 studies.

Non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs versus corticosteroids for controlling inflammation after uncomplicated cataract surgery

The aim of this review was to find out if topical non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (alone or taken in combination with topical corticosteroids) or topical corticosteroids alone are better for controlling eye inflammation after cataract surgery. Cochrane review authors collected and analyzed all relevant studies to answer this question and found 48 studies.

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