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Brimonidine (Into the eye)

Lowers pressure inside the eye caused by glaucoma or hypertension in the eye. Also relieves eye redness.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brimonidine eye drops is used alone or together with other medicines to lower pressure inside the eye that is caused by open-angle glaucoma or ocular (eye) hypertension. This medicine is an alpha-adrenergic agonist. Brimonidine eye drops is also used to relieve redness of the eye caused by minor eye irritations. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Alphagan P, Lumify
Other forms
On the skin
Drug classes About this
Antiglaucoma, Decongestant
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Neuroprotection (medicines to protect nerves involved in sight) for treatment of glaucoma in adults

The aim of this Cochrane review was to find out if neuroprotective medications (which aim to protect the nerves and cells in the eye) are effective for treating glaucoma in adults. We searched for all relevant studies to answer this question and found one study.

Treatments for rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition causing flushing, redness, red pimples and pustules on the face, and should not be confused with acne. Dilated blood vessels may appear near the surface of the skin (telangiectasia). It can also cause inflammation of the eyes or eyelids, or both (ocular rosacea). Some people can develop a thickening of the skin, especially of the nose (rhinophyma). Although the cause of rosacea remains unclear, a wide variety of treatments are available for this persistent (chronic) and recurring and often distressing disease. These include medications applied directly to the skin (topical), oral medications and light‐based therapies. We wanted to discover how people assessed their treatments: if the treatments changed their quality of life, if they saw changes in their condition and if there were side effects. From the doctors, we wanted to discover whether treatments changed the severity of rosacea, as well as how long it took before symptoms reduced and reappeared.

Brinzolamide plus brimonidine for the treatment of glaucoma: an update

INTRODUCTION: Glaucoma is a common sight-threatening condition that is primarily treated by lowering intraocular pressure (IOP). Today the mainstay of treatment is topical ocular hypotensive medications; many patients require more than one agent to achieve target IOP. For such patients, fixed combination formulations have several advantages including simplicity of treatment regimen, adherence to the treatment regimen, efficacy, improved ocular surface comfort and reduced cost. All currently available fixed combinations contain a β-blocker, which is contraindicated in some patients. Hence there is a clinical need for fixed-combination preparations without a β-blocker. This paper reviews the current literature on a new fixed-combination drug containing brinzolamide 1% and brimonidine 0.2% (BBFC).

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Summaries for consumers

Neuroprotection (medicines to protect nerves involved in sight) for treatment of glaucoma in adults

The aim of this Cochrane review was to find out if neuroprotective medications (which aim to protect the nerves and cells in the eye) are effective for treating glaucoma in adults. We searched for all relevant studies to answer this question and found one study.

Treatments for rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition causing flushing, redness, red pimples and pustules on the face, and should not be confused with acne. Dilated blood vessels may appear near the surface of the skin (telangiectasia). It can also cause inflammation of the eyes or eyelids, or both (ocular rosacea). Some people can develop a thickening of the skin, especially of the nose (rhinophyma). Although the cause of rosacea remains unclear, a wide variety of treatments are available for this persistent (chronic) and recurring and often distressing disease. These include medications applied directly to the skin (topical), oral medications and light‐based therapies. We wanted to discover how people assessed their treatments: if the treatments changed their quality of life, if they saw changes in their condition and if there were side effects. From the doctors, we wanted to discover whether treatments changed the severity of rosacea, as well as how long it took before symptoms reduced and reappeared.

Medicines given before, during, or after surgery to prevent short spikes of eye pressure after laser surgery for glaucoma

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out whether medicines given before, during, or after laser trabeculoplasty (LTP), a surgical method to reduce eye pressure, can prevent increased eye pressure shortly after surgery.

See all (4)

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