Home > Drugs A – Z > Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin (On the skin)

Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin (On the skin)

Treats acne.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin combination is used to treat acne. It works by killing the bacteria that cause acne and by keeping the skin pores clean (tiny openings on the skin). This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Acanya, Benzaclin, Clindoxyl, Duac, Neuac, Onexton
Drug classes About this
Antiacne, Antibacterial

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Meta-analysis comparing efficacy of benzoyl peroxide, clindamycin, benzoyl peroxide with salicylic acid, and combination benzoyl peroxide/clindamycin in acne

The authors concluded that at two to four weeks, combination benzoyl peroxide plus salicylic acid had the best profile for treating acne vulgaris; at 10 to 12 weeks, this combination treatment was similar to benzoyl peroxide/clindamycin treatment. Potential limitations with the review process and the uncertain quality of included trials suggest that the authors’ conclusions should be treated with caution.

The Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers in Primary and Secondary Care

Prevention of pressure ulcers usually involves an assessment to identify people most at risk of pressure ulcers, such as elderly, immobile people or those with spinal cord injury. Assessments are most commonly carried out using specific pressure area risk scores (for example, the Braden or Waterlow scales for predicting pressure sore risk or the, Glamorgan scale for paediatric pressure ulcers).

The use of light as a therapy for acne

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out whether treatment using lasers and other light sources improves the whiteheads and blackheads, and inflamed spots that people with acne have. We also wanted to know how people with acne assessed their own improvement, and whether they found that these therapies caused unpleasant effects like blistering or scarring. Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer these questions and found 71 studies, with a total of 4211 participants.

See all (5)

Summaries for consumers

The use of light as a therapy for acne

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out whether treatment using lasers and other light sources improves the whiteheads and blackheads, and inflamed spots that people with acne have. We also wanted to know how people with acne assessed their own improvement, and whether they found that these therapies caused unpleasant effects like blistering or scarring. Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer these questions and found 71 studies, with a total of 4211 participants.

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...