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Atropine (By injection)

Treats heart rhythm problems, stomach or bowel problems, and certain types of poisoning. Also used before surgery to decrease saliva.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
Atropen, DuoDote
Other forms
Into the eye
Drug classes About this
Anesthetic Adjunct, Cholinergic Antagonist, Gastrointestinal Agent, Nerve Gas Antidote, Urinary Antispasmodic
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Meta analysis of outcomes of penehyclidine hydrochloride and atropine in treatment of acute organophosphorus poisoning

Bibliographic details: Luo Z, Wei XC, Lin J.  Meta analysis of outcomes of penehyclidine hydrochloride and atropine in treatment of acute organophosphorus poisoning. Chinese Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases 2010; 28(1): 63-6520426991

Meta analysis of comparison between atropine and cyclopentolate in cycloplegia

Bibliographic details: Cheng SM, Zhou X, Li Y, Xu L.  Meta analysis of comparison between atropine and cyclopentolate in cycloplegia. Chinese Journal of Experimental Ophthalmology 2012; 30(12): 1135-1138 Available from: http://lib.cqvip.com/qk/92110A/201212/44159234.html

Treatment of amblyopia (lazy eye) with patching or drops/drug treatment

Amblyopia (referred to as lazy eye) is a common childhood condition, and is defined as defective visual acuity in one or both eyes, which is present with no demonstrable abnormality of the visual pathway and is not immediately resolved by wearing glasses. Treatment for amblyopia usually starts with prescribing necessary glasses to correct visually important refractive errors followed by promoting the use of the amblyopic eye. This systematic review aimed to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of two different treatment options used to promote the use of the amblyopic eye: conventional occlusion (patching) and atropine penalization (drops). Conventional occlusion involves patching the non‐amblyopic eye with an opaque patch for a set number of hours per day. Atropine penalization involves the instillation of atropine sulphate to blur the eyesight of the better‐seeing eye.

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Summaries for consumers

Treatment of amblyopia (lazy eye) with patching or drops/drug treatment

Amblyopia (referred to as lazy eye) is a common childhood condition, and is defined as defective visual acuity in one or both eyes, which is present with no demonstrable abnormality of the visual pathway and is not immediately resolved by wearing glasses. Treatment for amblyopia usually starts with prescribing necessary glasses to correct visually important refractive errors followed by promoting the use of the amblyopic eye. This systematic review aimed to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of two different treatment options used to promote the use of the amblyopic eye: conventional occlusion (patching) and atropine penalization (drops). Conventional occlusion involves patching the non‐amblyopic eye with an opaque patch for a set number of hours per day. Atropine penalization involves the instillation of atropine sulphate to blur the eyesight of the better‐seeing eye.

Propofol use for sedation in newborn babies undergoing procedures

Procedures performed in preterm and term neonates can be stressful and at times painful. Medications to reduce stress/pain for babies can lead to side effects. Propofol is a commonly used medication in adults and children to achieve sedation during minor procedures or major operations. Its use in newborn babies is studied in only one study of 63 babies. Propofol helped to reduce time to complete procedure, time of recovery and time to prepare drugs. However, with this small number of newborns studied, the safety can not be proven. Further studies are warranted.

Interventions to slow progression of nearsightedness in children

Nearsightedness (myopia) causes blurry vision when looking at distant objects. Approximately 33% of the population in the United States is nearsighted, and some Asian countries report that up to 80% of children are nearsighted. Several studies have examined a variety of methods (including eye drops, incomplete correction (known as 'undercorrection') of nearsightedness, multifocal lenses and contact lenses) to slow the worsening of nearsightedness.

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