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Amoxicillin/Clavulanate Potassium (By mouth)

Treats infections. This medicine is a penicillin antibiotic.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
Augmentin, Augmentin ES-600, Augmentin XR
Other forms
Oral route
Drug classes About this
Antibiotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Antibiotics prior to embryo transfer in ART

In vitro fertilisation (IVF) describes an assisted reproductive technology (ART) during which a woman undergoes ovarian stimulation, surgical retrieval of eggs, fertilisation of eggs outside of the body, and finally the transfer of resulting embryo(s) into the uterus by an embryo transfer (ET) procedure. During an ET, the embryo(s) is passed through the cervix by means of a catheter. Many variables affect the chance of pregnancy after ET, including embryo quality, uterine factors and the embryo transfer technique. High levels of bacteria and other organisms in the upper genital tract have a detrimental effect on pregnancy rate after ET. Administration of antibiotics prior to ET may reduce the growth of these organisms and improve the outcomes of IVF. This review considered the question of whether antibiotics given at any time prior to ET affect pregnancy rates and other important outcomes of IVF.

Using an antibiotic to prevent MRSA (methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections and related complications in people having surgery

Most bacterial wound infections after surgery heal naturally or after treatment with antibiotics.  Some bacteria are resistant to commonly‐used antibiotics, e.g. methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA infection after surgery is rare, but can occur in wounds (surgical site infections, or SSI), the chest, or bloodstream (bacteraemia), and can be life‐threatening. MRSA SSIs occur in 1% to 33% of people having surgery (depending on the type of operation) and result in extended hospitalisation.

Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes

Certain antibiotics given to women whose waters have broken early will improve babies' health. Babies born too soon are more likely to suffer ill health in the early days and sometimes throughout life. Early labour and birth (before 37 weeks) may be due to undetected infection as well as the waters breaking early. The review of 22 trials, involving 6872 women and their babies, found that, in the short term, certain antibiotics given to women, when their waters break early, increase the time babies stay in the womb. They reduced infection, but did not save more babies. One antibiotic (co‐amoxiclav) increased the number of babies with a rare condition of inflammation of the bowel (necrotising enterocolitis). Although, in the longer term (at seven years of age) antibiotics seem to have little effect on the health of children, the short‐term advantages are such that we recommend antibiotics should be given routinely.

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Summaries for consumers

Antibiotics prior to embryo transfer in ART

In vitro fertilisation (IVF) describes an assisted reproductive technology (ART) during which a woman undergoes ovarian stimulation, surgical retrieval of eggs, fertilisation of eggs outside of the body, and finally the transfer of resulting embryo(s) into the uterus by an embryo transfer (ET) procedure. During an ET, the embryo(s) is passed through the cervix by means of a catheter. Many variables affect the chance of pregnancy after ET, including embryo quality, uterine factors and the embryo transfer technique. High levels of bacteria and other organisms in the upper genital tract have a detrimental effect on pregnancy rate after ET. Administration of antibiotics prior to ET may reduce the growth of these organisms and improve the outcomes of IVF. This review considered the question of whether antibiotics given at any time prior to ET affect pregnancy rates and other important outcomes of IVF.

Using an antibiotic to prevent MRSA (methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections and related complications in people having surgery

Most bacterial wound infections after surgery heal naturally or after treatment with antibiotics.  Some bacteria are resistant to commonly‐used antibiotics, e.g. methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA infection after surgery is rare, but can occur in wounds (surgical site infections, or SSI), the chest, or bloodstream (bacteraemia), and can be life‐threatening. MRSA SSIs occur in 1% to 33% of people having surgery (depending on the type of operation) and result in extended hospitalisation.

Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes

Certain antibiotics given to women whose waters have broken early will improve babies' health. Babies born too soon are more likely to suffer ill health in the early days and sometimes throughout life. Early labour and birth (before 37 weeks) may be due to undetected infection as well as the waters breaking early. The review of 22 trials, involving 6872 women and their babies, found that, in the short term, certain antibiotics given to women, when their waters break early, increase the time babies stay in the womb. They reduced infection, but did not save more babies. One antibiotic (co‐amoxiclav) increased the number of babies with a rare condition of inflammation of the bowel (necrotising enterocolitis). Although, in the longer term (at seven years of age) antibiotics seem to have little effect on the health of children, the short‐term advantages are such that we recommend antibiotics should be given routinely.

See all (8)

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