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Amoxicillin (By mouth)

Treats infections or stomach ulcers. This medicine is a penicillin antibiotic.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Amoxicillin is used to treat bacterial infections in many different parts of the body. It is also used with other medicines (e.g., clarithromycin, lansoprazole) to treat H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcers. Amoxicillin belongs to the group of medicines known as penicillin antibiotics. It works by killing the bacteria and preventing their growth. However, this medicine will not work for colds, Read more
Brand names include
Amoxicot, Amoxil, Amoxil Pediatric, Apo-Amoxi, Apo-Amoxi Sugar-Free, DisperMox, Gen-Amoxicillin, Med Amoxicillin, Moxatag, Moxilin, Novamoxin, Novamoxin Reduced Sugar, Nu-Amoxi, Omeclamox-Pak, Prevpac, Riva-Amoxicillin, Scheinpharm Amoxicillin, Trimox, Triple Therapy, Zimamox
Drug classes About this
Antibiotic
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Dosage intervals of amoxicillin for the treatment of acute middle ear infection

Acute middle ear infection (acute otitis media) is a very common disease in children and may cause pain and hearing loss. Delayed or ineffective treatment may lead to serious complications such as ear drum perforation, sensorineural hearing loss or the disease becoming chronic. Amoxicillin, with or without clavulanate, is the most commonly used antibiotic for treating acute otitis media. Currently, a reduction in the dosing interval to one or two daily doses is being used, in preference to the conventional three or four daily doses, to aid compliance.

Antibiotics for mastitis in breastfeeding women

Inflammation of the breast, or mastitis, can be infective or non‐infective. Infective mastitis is one of the most common infections experienced by breastfeeding women. The condition (infective or not) varies in severity, ranging from mild symptoms with some local inflammation, redness, warmth and tenderness in the affected breast through to more serious symptoms including fever, abscess and septicaemia, which may require hospitalisation. Recovery can take time, and there may be substantial discomfort for the affected mother and her baby. Mastitis usually occurs during the first three months after birth and results in the mother being confined to bed for one day, followed by restricted activity. The condition is associated with decreased milk secretion, decreased productivity, and in difficulties caring for the baby. This burden to mothers, along with the cost of care, the potential negative impact on continuation of breastfeeding, and the danger of serious complications such as septicaemia, makes mastitis a serious condition which warrants early diagnosis and effective therapy. The review included two studies and approximately 125 women. One study compared two different antibiotics, and there were no differences between the two antibiotics for symptom relief. A second study comparing no treatment, breast emptying, and antibiotic therapy, with breast emptying suggested more rapid symptom relief with antibiotics. There is very little evidence on the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy, and more research is needed.

Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

In humans, a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease. People become infected when bitten by ticks carrying the bacterium. The person may experience symptoms in the joints, skin, muscles, and nervous system (peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord), the brain, and the spinal cord). Without antibiotic treatment, neurological Lyme disease either may resolve or cause long‐term problems. Neurological Lyme disease differs between Europe and the United States, probably because of differences in B. burgdorferi. Limited information exists about which antibiotics are better for the treatment of neurological Lyme disease.

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Summaries for consumers

Dosage intervals of amoxicillin for the treatment of acute middle ear infection

Acute middle ear infection (acute otitis media) is a very common disease in children and may cause pain and hearing loss. Delayed or ineffective treatment may lead to serious complications such as ear drum perforation, sensorineural hearing loss or the disease becoming chronic. Amoxicillin, with or without clavulanate, is the most commonly used antibiotic for treating acute otitis media. Currently, a reduction in the dosing interval to one or two daily doses is being used, in preference to the conventional three or four daily doses, to aid compliance.

Antibiotics for mastitis in breastfeeding women

Inflammation of the breast, or mastitis, can be infective or non‐infective. Infective mastitis is one of the most common infections experienced by breastfeeding women. The condition (infective or not) varies in severity, ranging from mild symptoms with some local inflammation, redness, warmth and tenderness in the affected breast through to more serious symptoms including fever, abscess and septicaemia, which may require hospitalisation. Recovery can take time, and there may be substantial discomfort for the affected mother and her baby. Mastitis usually occurs during the first three months after birth and results in the mother being confined to bed for one day, followed by restricted activity. The condition is associated with decreased milk secretion, decreased productivity, and in difficulties caring for the baby. This burden to mothers, along with the cost of care, the potential negative impact on continuation of breastfeeding, and the danger of serious complications such as septicaemia, makes mastitis a serious condition which warrants early diagnosis and effective therapy. The review included two studies and approximately 125 women. One study compared two different antibiotics, and there were no differences between the two antibiotics for symptom relief. A second study comparing no treatment, breast emptying, and antibiotic therapy, with breast emptying suggested more rapid symptom relief with antibiotics. There is very little evidence on the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy, and more research is needed.

Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

In humans, a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease. People become infected when bitten by ticks carrying the bacterium. The person may experience symptoms in the joints, skin, muscles, and nervous system (peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord), the brain, and the spinal cord). Without antibiotic treatment, neurological Lyme disease either may resolve or cause long‐term problems. Neurological Lyme disease differs between Europe and the United States, probably because of differences in B. burgdorferi. Limited information exists about which antibiotics are better for the treatment of neurological Lyme disease.

See all (35)

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