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Amikacin (By injection)

Treats infections. Belongs to a class of drugs called aminoglycoside antibiotics.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Amikacin injection is used to treat serious bacterial infections in many different parts of the body. This medicine is for short-term use only (7 to 10 days). Amikacin belongs to the class of medicines known as aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria or preventing their growth. However, this medicine will not work for colds, flu, or other virus infections. Amikacin injection is… Read more
Brand names include
Amikin, Amikin Pediatric, amikacin sulfate NovaPlus
Drug classes About this
Antibiotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Rapid diagnosis of drug resistance to fluoroquinolones, amikacin, capreomycin, kanamycin and ethambutol using genotype MTBDRsl assay: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: There are urgent needs for rapid and accurate drug susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis. GenoType MTBDRsl is a new molecular kit designed for rapid identification of the resistance to the second-line antituberculosis drugs with a single strip. In recent years, it has been evaluated in many settings, but with varied results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to synthesize the latest data on the diagnostic accuracy of GenoType MTBDRsl in detecting drug resistance to fluoroquinolones, amikacin, capreomycin, kanamycin and ethambutol, in comparison with the phenotypic drug susceptibility test.

Inhaling antibiotics to treat temporary worsening of lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a serious genetic disorder that results in abnormal mucus in several parts of the body. In the lungs the abnormal mucus is linked to the likelihood of repeated infection. A pulmonary exacerbation is when symptoms become more severe, mostly due to more worsening infection. Antibiotics are an essential part of treatment and may be given in different ways, one of these is by inhaling the drug. We wanted to learn if this type of treatment improved general health and which method of giving antibiotics was best. We found there have been only six trials with a total of 208 people which compared inhaled antibiotics to intravenous antibiotics for treating pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis. The results of these trials did not allow us to answer our question. We are not able to show from these trials if inhaled antibiotics are useful for treating pulmonary exacerbations.

Systematic review, meta-analysis and economic modelling of molecular diagnostic tests for antibiotic resistance in tuberculosis

The study found that rapid molecular tests for rifampicin and isoniazid resistance resistance in tuberculosis were sensitive and specific, and may be cost-effective when added to culture drug susceptibility testing in the UK.

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Summaries for consumers

Inhaling antibiotics to treat temporary worsening of lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a serious genetic disorder that results in abnormal mucus in several parts of the body. In the lungs the abnormal mucus is linked to the likelihood of repeated infection. A pulmonary exacerbation is when symptoms become more severe, mostly due to more worsening infection. Antibiotics are an essential part of treatment and may be given in different ways, one of these is by inhaling the drug. We wanted to learn if this type of treatment improved general health and which method of giving antibiotics was best. We found there have been only six trials with a total of 208 people which compared inhaled antibiotics to intravenous antibiotics for treating pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis. The results of these trials did not allow us to answer our question. We are not able to show from these trials if inhaled antibiotics are useful for treating pulmonary exacerbations.

Antibiotics for preventing early central venous catheter Gram positive infections in people with cancer

People with cancer who undergo anti‐cancer treatment (chemotherapy) often have a tube inserted into a large vein (central venous catheter or CVC) through which their chemotherapy is given. As chemotherapy is usually administered at regular intervals over several months to years, long‐term, semi‐permanent, tunnelled CVCs (TCVCs) or totally implanted devices (TIDs) are frequently used. Despite sterile insertion and post‐insertion care, these long‐term CVCs may become infected. These infections are usually caused by Gram positive bacteria.

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