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Albuterol (By mouth)

Treats bronchospasm.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Albuterol is used to treat bronchospasm or wheezing in patients with reversible obstructive airway disease, such as asthma. Albuterol belongs to the family of medicines known as adrenergic bronchodilators. Adrenergic bronchodilators are medicines that open up the bronchial tubes (air passages) in the lungs. They relieve cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and troubled breathing by increasing… Read more
Brand names include
Apo-Salvent Inhaler, Proventil, Proventil Repetabs, Ventolin, VoSpire ER, Volmax
Other forms
By breathing
Drug classes About this
Bronchodilator, Cardiovascular Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

The use of salbutamol (albuterol) in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn

Background: Transient tachypnea (abnormally rapid breathing) of the newborn is characterized by high respiratory rate (more than 60 breaths per minute) and signs of respiratory distress (difficulty in breathing); it typically appears within the first two hours of life in infants born at or after 34 weeks' gestational age. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually improves without treatment, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The idea behind using salbutamol for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that medicines called β‐agonists, such as epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), can accelerate the rate of clearance of fluid from small cavities within the lungs called the alveoli. This review reported and critically analyzed the available evidence on the effectiveness of salbutamol in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn.

Does daily treatment with formoterol result in more serious adverse events compared to placebo or daily salbutamol?

Asthma is a common condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. When a person with asthma comes into contact with an irritant (an asthma trigger), the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten, the airways become narrower, and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. This leads to the symptoms of asthma ‐ wheezing, coughing and difficulty in breathing. They can lead to an asthma attack or exacerbation. People can have underlying inflammation in their lungs and sticky mucus or phlegm may build up, which can further narrow the airways. There is no cure for asthma; however there are medications that allow most people to control their asthma so they can get on with daily life.

Does daily treatment with salmeterol result in more serious adverse events compared with placebo or a salbutamol?

Asthma is a common condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. When a person with asthma comes into contact with an irritant (an asthma trigger), the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten, the airways become narrower, and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. This leads to the symptoms of asthma ‐ wheezing, coughing and difficulty in breathing. They can lead to an asthma attack or exacerbation. People can have underlying inflammation in their lungs and sticky mucus or phlegm may build up, which can further narrow the airways. There is no cure for asthma; however there are medications that allow most people to control their asthma so they can get on with daily life.

See all (147)

Summaries for consumers

The use of salbutamol (albuterol) in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn

Background: Transient tachypnea (abnormally rapid breathing) of the newborn is characterized by high respiratory rate (more than 60 breaths per minute) and signs of respiratory distress (difficulty in breathing); it typically appears within the first two hours of life in infants born at or after 34 weeks' gestational age. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually improves without treatment, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The idea behind using salbutamol for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that medicines called β‐agonists, such as epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), can accelerate the rate of clearance of fluid from small cavities within the lungs called the alveoli. This review reported and critically analyzed the available evidence on the effectiveness of salbutamol in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn.

Does daily treatment with formoterol result in more serious adverse events compared to placebo or daily salbutamol?

Asthma is a common condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. When a person with asthma comes into contact with an irritant (an asthma trigger), the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten, the airways become narrower, and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. This leads to the symptoms of asthma ‐ wheezing, coughing and difficulty in breathing. They can lead to an asthma attack or exacerbation. People can have underlying inflammation in their lungs and sticky mucus or phlegm may build up, which can further narrow the airways. There is no cure for asthma; however there are medications that allow most people to control their asthma so they can get on with daily life.

Does daily treatment with salmeterol result in more serious adverse events compared with placebo or a salbutamol?

Asthma is a common condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. When a person with asthma comes into contact with an irritant (an asthma trigger), the muscles around the walls of the airways tighten, the airways become narrower, and the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and starts to swell. This leads to the symptoms of asthma ‐ wheezing, coughing and difficulty in breathing. They can lead to an asthma attack or exacerbation. People can have underlying inflammation in their lungs and sticky mucus or phlegm may build up, which can further narrow the airways. There is no cure for asthma; however there are medications that allow most people to control their asthma so they can get on with daily life.

See all (64)

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