Mesna

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Mesna is used to reduce the harmful effects of some cancer medicines (eg, ifosfamide) on the bladder. This medicine is available only with your doctor's… Read more

Brand names include: Mesnex

By injection

Mesna injection is used to reduce the harmful effects of some cancer medicines (eg, ifosfamide) on the bladder. This medicine is to be given only by or… Read more

Brand names include: Mesna Novaplus, Mesnex

Drug classes About this
Hemorrhagic Cystitis Inhibitor

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

The delivery of chemotherapy at home: an evidence synthesis

The study found that trials comparing different settings for delivering intravenous chemotherapy appear difficult to conduct. Consequently, few conclusions can be reached regarding the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the home, community and outpatient settings. Future studies could produce more informative data if careful consideration is given to study design.

Interventions to reduce haemorrhage during myomectomy for treating fibroids

Some women have non‐cancerous growths of the uterus, called fibroids. In a third of cases the fibroids produce symptoms, such as vaginal bleeding, that warrant treatment. The surgical removal of the fibroids, called myomectomy, is one of the treatment options for fibroids. It can be accomplished by either laparotomy (through an incision into the abdomen) or laparoscopy (keyhole surgery). The procedure is associated with heavy bleeding. Many interventions have been used by doctors to reduce bleeding during an operation for removing fibroids but it is unclear whether or not the interventions are effective.

Diagnosis and Management of Metastatic Malignant Disease of Unknown Primary Origin

The term “cancer of unknown primary” refers to a condition in which a patient has metastatic malignancy without an identified primary source. This is a very heterogeneous disease in which the type of tumour, the extent of spread, and the outcome of treatment all vary widely. When categorising patients with cancer of unknown primary, one important factor initially considered is the cell type of origin of the metastatic disease. The majority of patients have malignancy which appears to derive from epithelial cells, and hence are regarded as having carcinoma of unknown primary. Patients with tumours of non-epithelial lineage (melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, germ-cell) form a distinct and important minority, since subsequent management can often be satisfactorily undertaken even in the absence of an identifiable primary source. Such patients are not considered in this guideline, since their care is adequately defined in existing guidelines for their specific tumour type. The term “carcinoma of unknown primary” (CUP) is used henceforth to refer to those patients with metastatic malignancy of epithelial, neuroendocrine or undifferentiated lineage whose investigation and management is considered within the scope of this guideline.

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Summaries for consumers

Interventions to reduce haemorrhage during myomectomy for treating fibroids

Some women have non‐cancerous growths of the uterus, called fibroids. In a third of cases the fibroids produce symptoms, such as vaginal bleeding, that warrant treatment. The surgical removal of the fibroids, called myomectomy, is one of the treatment options for fibroids. It can be accomplished by either laparotomy (through an incision into the abdomen) or laparoscopy (keyhole surgery). The procedure is associated with heavy bleeding. Many interventions have been used by doctors to reduce bleeding during an operation for removing fibroids but it is unclear whether or not the interventions are effective.

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