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Insulin Aspart

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By injection

Insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart is a combination of a fast-acting insulin and an intermediate-acting type of human insulin. Insulin is used… Read more

Brand names include: NovoLOG Mix 70/30 FlexPen

By injection

Insulin aspart is a fast-acting type of insulin. Insulin is one of many hormones that help the body turn the food we eat into energy. This is done by… Read more

Brand names include: NovoLOG PenFill

Drug classes About this
Antidiabetic
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Biphasic insulin aspart 30 given three times daily for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Zhang L, Ouyang XB, He JD.  Biphasic insulin aspart 30 given three times daily for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2012; 12(7): 822-829 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=2012070015

Short acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin in patients with diabetes mellitus

Short acting insulin analogues (Lispro, Aspart, Glulisine) act more quickly than regular human insulin. It can be injected immediately before meals and leads to lower blood sugar levels after food intake. Our analysis showed that short acting insulin analogues were almost identically effective to regular human insulin in long term glycaemic control and were associated with similar episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia). No information on late complications such as problems with the eyes, kidneys or feet are existing. Until long term safety data are available we suggest a cautious response to the vigorous promotion of insulin analogues.

Subcutaneous rapid‐acting insulin analogues for diabetic ketoacidosis

Rapid‐acting insulin analogues (artificial insulin such as insulin lispro, insulin aspart, or insulin glulisine) act more quickly than regular human insulin. In people with a specific type of life‐threatening diabetic coma due to uncontrolled diabetes, called diabetic ketoacidosis, prompt administration of intravenous regular insulin is standard therapy. The rapid‐acting insulin analogues, if injected subcutaneously, act faster than subcutaneously administered regular insulin. The need for a continuous intravenous infusion, an intervention that usually requires admission to an intensive care unit, can thereby be avoided. This means that subcutaneously given insulin analogues for diabetic ketoacidosis might be applied in the emergency department and a general medicine ward.

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Summaries for consumers

Short acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin in patients with diabetes mellitus

Short acting insulin analogues (Lispro, Aspart, Glulisine) act more quickly than regular human insulin. It can be injected immediately before meals and leads to lower blood sugar levels after food intake. Our analysis showed that short acting insulin analogues were almost identically effective to regular human insulin in long term glycaemic control and were associated with similar episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia). No information on late complications such as problems with the eyes, kidneys or feet are existing. Until long term safety data are available we suggest a cautious response to the vigorous promotion of insulin analogues.

Subcutaneous rapid‐acting insulin analogues for diabetic ketoacidosis

Rapid‐acting insulin analogues (artificial insulin such as insulin lispro, insulin aspart, or insulin glulisine) act more quickly than regular human insulin. In people with a specific type of life‐threatening diabetic coma due to uncontrolled diabetes, called diabetic ketoacidosis, prompt administration of intravenous regular insulin is standard therapy. The rapid‐acting insulin analogues, if injected subcutaneously, act faster than subcutaneously administered regular insulin. The need for a continuous intravenous infusion, an intervention that usually requires admission to an intensive care unit, can thereby be avoided. This means that subcutaneously given insulin analogues for diabetic ketoacidosis might be applied in the emergency department and a general medicine ward.

Insulin degludec (Tresiba) for diabetes in teenagers and children: Overview

In 2015 insulin degludec (trade name: Tresiba) was approved in Germany for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in teenagers and children over the age of one. This drug is a long-acting insulin analogue. It is used to regulate blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours.

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