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Factor IX Complex

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By injection

Prevents and controls bleeding in patients with hemophilia B (also known as Factor IX deficiency or Christmas disease)… Read more

Brand names include: Bebulin, Profilnine

By injection

Prevents and controls bleeding in patients with hemophilia B (also known as Factor IX deficiency or Christmas disease)… Read more

Brand names include: Alphanine SD, Mononine

By injection

Factor IX is a protein produced naturally in the body. It helps the blood form clots to stop bleeding. Injections of factor IX are used to treat hemophilia… Read more

Brand names include: Alphanine SD, Alprolix

Drug classes About this
Antihemophilic Agent, Hemostatic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Drugs that prevent oral bleeding in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions

We reviewed the evidence about whether antifibrinolytic medicine (drugs that promote blood clotting) such as tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid, can prevent oral bleeding in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Recombinant (non‐human) factor VIIa clotting factor concentrates versus plasma concentrates for acute bleeds in people with haemophilia and inhibitors

We wanted to find evidence on the effectiveness of recombinant factor VIIa (containing no human proteins) as compared to concentrates derived from plasma for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with haemophilia with inhibitors.

Comparative Effectiveness of In-Hospital Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa for Off-Label Indications vs. Usual Care [Internet]

This report evaluates the level of evidence currently available to support the effectiveness and safety of using recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa) for clinical indications not approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). rFVIIa is approved for a variety of uses in hemophilia patients who have developed antibody inhibitors that compromise the use of standard factor replacement. Use of this costly biologic product has expanded beyond these hemophilia-related indications to encompass a range of off-label uses, most of which are in-hospital uses. These uses differ substantially from the drug’s FDA approved label. The purpose of this report is two-fold: (1) To document the full range of clinical indications for which rFVIIa is being used and the types of studies available to evaluate these uses and (2) To provide a comparative effectiveness review of rFVIIa vs. usual care for several in-hospital clinical indications: intracranial hemorrhage, massive bleeding secondary to trauma, and the selected surgical procedures of cardiac surgery, liver transplantation, and prostatectomy.

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Summaries for consumers

Drugs that prevent oral bleeding in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions

We reviewed the evidence about whether antifibrinolytic medicine (drugs that promote blood clotting) such as tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid, can prevent oral bleeding in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Nonacog beta pegol (Refixia) for the treatment of hemophilia B: Overview

Nonacog beta pegol (trade name: Refixia) has been approved in Germany since June 2017 for the treatment of hemophilia B in people over the age of 12.

Recombinant (non‐human) factor VIIa clotting factor concentrates versus plasma concentrates for acute bleeds in people with haemophilia and inhibitors

We wanted to find evidence on the effectiveness of recombinant factor VIIa (containing no human proteins) as compared to concentrates derived from plasma for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with haemophilia with inhibitors.

See all (8)

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