Home > Drugs A – Z > Dipyridamole

Dipyridamole

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Keeps blood clots from forming after some types of heart surgery. Also used to prevent strokes and heart attacks. Used in combination with other medi… Read more

Brand names include: Dipyridamole

By injection

Used in place of exercise during certain heart tests… Read more

Drug classes About this
Diagnostic Agent, Cardiac Function, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitor
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Dipyridamole for preventing stroke and other vascular events in patients with vascular disease

Patients with symptoms of arterial disease have a high risk of getting a (possibly fatal) stroke or heart attack (myocardial infarction). Antiplatelet therapy with drugs like aspirin prevents blood clotting and reduces the risk of strokes, heart attacks, and death from vascular disease. Dipyridamole, another antiplatelet drug, given on its own or together with aspirin might reduce the risk even further. This review included 29 studies involving 23019 participants. When we compared the effects of dipyridamole (alone or together with aspirin) with aspirin alone there was no evidence of an effect on death from vascular causes. When we compared the effects on the occurrence of vascular events (strokes, heart attacks, and deaths from vascular diseases) the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole had an advantage over aspirin alone. This result holds particularly true for patients with ischaemic stroke.

Dipyridamole + ASA for secondary prevention after a stroke or TIA: Executive summary of final report A09 -01, Version 1.0

The aim of this research was to assess the benefit of treatment with the combination of the two agents dipyridamole plus ASA as secondary prevention after an ischaemic stroke or TIA. This combination therapy was compared to other drug interventions or placebo on the basis of patient-relevant outcomes.

Clopidogrel and Modified-Release Dipyridamole for the Prevention of Occlusive Vascular Events (Review of Technology Appraisal No. 90): A Systematic Review and Economic Analysis

Occlusive vascular events such as myocardial infarction (MI), ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are the result of a reduction in blood flow associated with an artery becoming narrow or blocked through atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. Peripheral arterial disease is the result of narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the muscles and other tissues, usually in the lower extremities. The primary objective in the treatment of all patients with a history of occlusive vascular events and peripheral arterial disease is to prevent the occurrence of new occlusive vascular events.

See all (106)

Summaries for consumers

Dipyridamole for preventing stroke and other vascular events in patients with vascular disease

Patients with symptoms of arterial disease have a high risk of getting a (possibly fatal) stroke or heart attack (myocardial infarction). Antiplatelet therapy with drugs like aspirin prevents blood clotting and reduces the risk of strokes, heart attacks, and death from vascular disease. Dipyridamole, another antiplatelet drug, given on its own or together with aspirin might reduce the risk even further. This review included 29 studies involving 23019 participants. When we compared the effects of dipyridamole (alone or together with aspirin) with aspirin alone there was no evidence of an effect on death from vascular causes. When we compared the effects on the occurrence of vascular events (strokes, heart attacks, and deaths from vascular diseases) the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole had an advantage over aspirin alone. This result holds particularly true for patients with ischaemic stroke.

Antithrombotic therapy for improving maternal or infant health outcomes in women considered at risk of placental dysfunction

Pregnancy complications such as pre‐eclampsia and eclampsia, intrauterine fetal growth restriction and placental abruption are thought to be related to abnormalities in the development and function of the placenta. Treatment with heparin to prevent the development of blood clots within the placenta appears to be a promising intervention to prevent these complications. The numbers of pregnant women with pre‐eclampsia, preterm birth, perinatal death and a low birthweight infant (weighing less than the 10th centile for gestational age) were reduced with this treatment. Ten randomised trials involving 1139 women met the inclusion criteria for the review. Nine studies compared heparin (alone or in combination with dipyridamole) with no treatment; and one compared triazolopyrimidine with placebo. The most commonly recognised side effect for women related to this treatment was mild skin bruising. To date, important information about serious adverse infant and long‐term childhood outcomes with using anti‐clotting medications is unavailable. Further research is required.

Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke

We wanted to compare the safety and effectiveness of oral antiplatelet therapy versus placebo or no treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke to see if oral antiplatelet drugs reduced the number of deaths and improved the long‐term outcomes in survivors.

See all (18)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...