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Conjugated Estrogens

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Conjugated estrogens are a medicine that contains a mixture of estrogen hormones. It is used to treat moderate to severe hot flashes, changes in and around… Read more

Brand names include: Premarin, Premphase

By injection

Conjugated estrogens is a medicine that contains a mixture of estrogen hormones. Conjugated estrogens injection is used to treat abnormal bleeding from… Read more

Brand names include: Premarin, Premarin Intravenous

Into the vagina

Conjugated estrogens is a medicine that contains a mixture of estrogen hormones. Conjugated estrogens vaginal cream is used to treat changes in and around… Read more

Brand names include: Premarin, Premarin Vaginal

Drug classes About this
Contraceptive, Endocrine-Metabolic Agent, Female Reproductive Agent, Musculoskeletal Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Oestrogens for treatment or prevention of pelvic organ prolapse in women

Many women suffer from pelvic organ prolapse, which is a downward descent of the vagina (front passage) and/or uterus (womb). It is more common after childbirth and after the menopause.  Women may not have symptoms or they may feel bulge and/or pressure vaginally, as well as a range of urinary, bowel and sexual problems. These symptoms may affect quality of life. Prolapse is associated with weakness in muscles and supporting structures in the pelvis. Treatment can be conservative (pessaries or rings), pelvic floor muscle training or surgery.  Oestrogen (female hormone) treatment can be used to reduce thinning of the vaginal and pelvic tissues. This may help to reduce or prevent the symptoms of prolapse, or may be used to make other prolapse treatments work better. This review did not find any clear evidence to suggest whether oestrogens work. However, as they are often used, especially with pessaries or before and after prolapse surgery, research is needed to identify any benefits or risks.  

Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of medical interventions for treating people with traumatic hyphema.

Oestrogens for urinary incontinence in women

Urinary incontinence is the leakage of urine when coughing or exercising (stress urinary incontinence) or after a strong uncontrollable urge to urinate (urgency urinary incontinence). In women who have gone through the menopause, low oestrogen levels may contribute to urinary incontinence. The review found 34 trials including more than 19,000 women of whom over 9000 received oestrogen. The review found that significantly more women who received local (vaginal) oestrogen for incontinence reported that their symptoms improved compared to placebo. There was no evidence about whether the benefits of local oestrogen continue after stopping treatment but this seems unlikely as women would revert to having naturally low oestrogen levels. Trials investigating systemic (oral) administration, on the other hand, found that women reported worsening of their urinary symptoms. The evidence comes mainly from two very large trials including 17,642 incontinent women. These trials were investigating other effects of hormone replacement therapy as well as incontinence, such as prevention of heart attacks in women with coronary heart disease, bone fractures, breast and colorectal cancer. In addition, in one large trial women who did not have incontinence at first were more likely to develop incontinence. There may be risks from long‐term use of systemic oestrogen, such as heart disease, stroke and cancer of the breast and uterus.

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Summaries for consumers

Oestrogens for treatment or prevention of pelvic organ prolapse in women

Many women suffer from pelvic organ prolapse, which is a downward descent of the vagina (front passage) and/or uterus (womb). It is more common after childbirth and after the menopause.  Women may not have symptoms or they may feel bulge and/or pressure vaginally, as well as a range of urinary, bowel and sexual problems. These symptoms may affect quality of life. Prolapse is associated with weakness in muscles and supporting structures in the pelvis. Treatment can be conservative (pessaries or rings), pelvic floor muscle training or surgery.  Oestrogen (female hormone) treatment can be used to reduce thinning of the vaginal and pelvic tissues. This may help to reduce or prevent the symptoms of prolapse, or may be used to make other prolapse treatments work better. This review did not find any clear evidence to suggest whether oestrogens work. However, as they are often used, especially with pessaries or before and after prolapse surgery, research is needed to identify any benefits or risks.  

Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of medical interventions for treating people with traumatic hyphema.

Oestrogens for urinary incontinence in women

Urinary incontinence is the leakage of urine when coughing or exercising (stress urinary incontinence) or after a strong uncontrollable urge to urinate (urgency urinary incontinence). In women who have gone through the menopause, low oestrogen levels may contribute to urinary incontinence. The review found 34 trials including more than 19,000 women of whom over 9000 received oestrogen. The review found that significantly more women who received local (vaginal) oestrogen for incontinence reported that their symptoms improved compared to placebo. There was no evidence about whether the benefits of local oestrogen continue after stopping treatment but this seems unlikely as women would revert to having naturally low oestrogen levels. Trials investigating systemic (oral) administration, on the other hand, found that women reported worsening of their urinary symptoms. The evidence comes mainly from two very large trials including 17,642 incontinent women. These trials were investigating other effects of hormone replacement therapy as well as incontinence, such as prevention of heart attacks in women with coronary heart disease, bone fractures, breast and colorectal cancer. In addition, in one large trial women who did not have incontinence at first were more likely to develop incontinence. There may be risks from long‐term use of systemic oestrogen, such as heart disease, stroke and cancer of the breast and uterus.

See all (6)

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