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Chloramphenicol

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By injection

Treats serious infections caused by bacteria. This medicine is an antibiotic… Read more

Into the eye

Chloramphenicol belongs to the family of medicines called antibiotics. Chloramphenicol ophthalmic preparations are used to treat infections of the eye… Read more

Brand names include: Ak-Chlor, Chloromycetin

Oral route, Intravenous route, Injection route

Chloramphenicol is used in the treatment of infections caused by bacteria. It works by killing bacteria or preventing their growth. Chloramphenicol is… Read more

Brand names include: Chloromycetin, Chloromycetin Sodium Succinate

Otic route

Chloramphenicol belongs to the family of medicines called antibiotics. Chloramphenicol otic drops are used to treat infections of the ear canal. This… Read more

Brand names include: Chloromycetin, Sopamycetin

Drug classes About this
Antibacterial, Antibiotic, Chloramphenicol (class)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Antibiotics for treating septic abortion

A septic abortion is any abortion with infection after a miscarriage or intentional pregnancy termination. One of the signs of septic abortion is fever. Antibiotic treatment is very important for the treatment of septic abortion. The recommended treatments include antibiotics that have effects on different types of bacteria. However, there is no agreement on the most effective antibiotics to be used either alone or in combination to treat septic abortion.

Newer, third generation cephalosporins versus conventional antibiotics for treating acute bacterial meningitis

Acute bacterial meningitis is a life‐threatening illness. Currently the evidence suggests that old and new antibiotics offer the same level of treatment. Bacteria which cause meningitis are often thought to be resistant to conventional (older) antibiotics, and so doctors often prescribe newer antibiotics (called third generation cephalosporins). Commencing treatment early is vitally important and the choice of antibiotic is often made without any knowledge of possible drug resistance. This review examined 19 studies with 1496 participants to see whether there is a difference in effectiveness between conventional and newer antibiotics. This review found no differences. Adverse effects in both approaches were similar, except for diarrhoea, which was more common in the cephalosporin group. Only three studies dealt with adults; the remaining studies recruited participants aged 15 years and younger. Therefore, we believe that the results probably pertain more to children. Conventional and newer antibiotics seem reasonable options for initial, immediate treatment. The choice may depend on availability, affordability and local policies.

Different antibiotics for community‐acquired pneumonia in otherwise healthy children younger than 18 years of age in hospital and outpatient settings

Pneumonia is the leading cause of mortality in children under five years of age. Most cases of community‐acquired pneumonia (CAP) in low‐income countries are caused by bacteria. This systematic review identified 29 randomised controlled trials from many different countries enrolling 14,188 children and comparing antibiotics for treatment of CAP in children. Most were single studies only.

See all (31)

Summaries for consumers

Antibiotics for treating septic abortion

A septic abortion is any abortion with infection after a miscarriage or intentional pregnancy termination. One of the signs of septic abortion is fever. Antibiotic treatment is very important for the treatment of septic abortion. The recommended treatments include antibiotics that have effects on different types of bacteria. However, there is no agreement on the most effective antibiotics to be used either alone or in combination to treat septic abortion.

Newer, third generation cephalosporins versus conventional antibiotics for treating acute bacterial meningitis

Acute bacterial meningitis is a life‐threatening illness. Currently the evidence suggests that old and new antibiotics offer the same level of treatment. Bacteria which cause meningitis are often thought to be resistant to conventional (older) antibiotics, and so doctors often prescribe newer antibiotics (called third generation cephalosporins). Commencing treatment early is vitally important and the choice of antibiotic is often made without any knowledge of possible drug resistance. This review examined 19 studies with 1496 participants to see whether there is a difference in effectiveness between conventional and newer antibiotics. This review found no differences. Adverse effects in both approaches were similar, except for diarrhoea, which was more common in the cephalosporin group. Only three studies dealt with adults; the remaining studies recruited participants aged 15 years and younger. Therefore, we believe that the results probably pertain more to children. Conventional and newer antibiotics seem reasonable options for initial, immediate treatment. The choice may depend on availability, affordability and local policies.

Different antibiotics for community‐acquired pneumonia in otherwise healthy children younger than 18 years of age in hospital and outpatient settings

Pneumonia is the leading cause of mortality in children under five years of age. Most cases of community‐acquired pneumonia (CAP) in low‐income countries are caused by bacteria. This systematic review identified 29 randomised controlled trials from many different countries enrolling 14,188 children and comparing antibiotics for treatment of CAP in children. Most were single studies only.

See all (11)

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